Evaluation of Quality of Life (QOL) in Spanish-Speaking and English-Speaking Survivors of Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165665
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of Quality of Life (QOL) in Spanish-Speaking and English-Speaking Survivors of Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT)
Author(s):
Grant, Marcia
Author Details:
Marcia Grant, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Director Research and Education, City of Hope National Medical Center/Nursing Research, Duarte, California, USA, email: MGRANT@SMTPLINK.COH.ORG
Abstract:
Significance, Problem, and Purpose: Current trends in cancer care have begun to focus on the QOL of survivors and the relationship to long-term complications of treatment. Cancer nursing care for the vulnerable population of BMT survivors involves competent and culturally sensitive care in planning for rehabilitation and long-term follow up. Little has been published about the differences in QOL responses based on cultural background. The purpose of this study was to compare QOL assessment in Spanish-speaking survivors of BMT with matched English-speaking BMT survivors. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The QOL-BMT questionnaire was developed using the four-dimensional framework for QOL developed at the City of Hope National Medical Center. Dimensions include physical, psychological, social, and spiritual well being. Principles for developing translated questionnaires were used to adapt the original English questionnaire. It was translated into Spanish, back translated, and pilot tested for accuracy. Reliability and validity of both questionnaires were established in previous studies. Methods: A group of 53 Spanish-speaking BMT survivors were matched on age, gender, time since transplant, and type of transplant (allogeneic, autologous, or matched-unrelated donor) with 74 English-speaking BMT survivors. The questionnaire contains 47 items on demographic and general health concerns, and 43 items organized into the four QOL dimensions. Analysis/Evaluation: Initial analysis established the accuracy of the matched sampling procedure by showing no significant differences between the groups in relation to age, gender, time since transplant, and type of transplant. Comparative analysis, using SPSS, was conducted for demographic and general health concerns, and across the four QOL dimensions. For dichotomous variables, a chi-square analysis for differences was used. For continuous variables, t-tests were used. Comparisons in QOL included each of the four dimensions, as well as individual items. Findings and Implications: Significantly more Spanish-speaking patients were unable to identify whether or not graft-versus-host disease was present, and reported fewer colds after transplant than before transplant. Fewer Spanish-speaking patients returned to their previous jobs and more Spanish-speaking patients reported not having health insurance. Both groups had highest QOL subscale scores in spiritual well being, with Spanish-speaking patients significantly higher than English-speaking patients. Lowest QOL scores were in social well being, with no differences between groups. Spanish-speaking survivors reported significantly better scores in happiness, control of life, and satisfaction with life. In contrast, Spanish-speaking survivors reported significantly lower scores in coping, and were more fearful of recurrence, second cancers, and metastases. Spanish-speaking patients had significantly more family distress related to the transplant. In fact, family distress was one of the most important items that impacted negatively on QOL. Spanish-speaking patients were more likely to feel they had a purpose in life, and were more hopeful than English-speaking patients were. These and other differences will be presented as a basis for tailoring supportive interventions for individual patients, knowing that differences may be based on cultural background.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of Quality of Life (QOL) in Spanish-Speaking and English-Speaking Survivors of Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorGrant, Marciaen_US
dc.author.detailsMarcia Grant, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Director Research and Education, City of Hope National Medical Center/Nursing Research, Duarte, California, USA, email: MGRANT@SMTPLINK.COH.ORGen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165665-
dc.description.abstractSignificance, Problem, and Purpose: Current trends in cancer care have begun to focus on the QOL of survivors and the relationship to long-term complications of treatment. Cancer nursing care for the vulnerable population of BMT survivors involves competent and culturally sensitive care in planning for rehabilitation and long-term follow up. Little has been published about the differences in QOL responses based on cultural background. The purpose of this study was to compare QOL assessment in Spanish-speaking survivors of BMT with matched English-speaking BMT survivors. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The QOL-BMT questionnaire was developed using the four-dimensional framework for QOL developed at the City of Hope National Medical Center. Dimensions include physical, psychological, social, and spiritual well being. Principles for developing translated questionnaires were used to adapt the original English questionnaire. It was translated into Spanish, back translated, and pilot tested for accuracy. Reliability and validity of both questionnaires were established in previous studies. Methods: A group of 53 Spanish-speaking BMT survivors were matched on age, gender, time since transplant, and type of transplant (allogeneic, autologous, or matched-unrelated donor) with 74 English-speaking BMT survivors. The questionnaire contains 47 items on demographic and general health concerns, and 43 items organized into the four QOL dimensions. Analysis/Evaluation: Initial analysis established the accuracy of the matched sampling procedure by showing no significant differences between the groups in relation to age, gender, time since transplant, and type of transplant. Comparative analysis, using SPSS, was conducted for demographic and general health concerns, and across the four QOL dimensions. For dichotomous variables, a chi-square analysis for differences was used. For continuous variables, t-tests were used. Comparisons in QOL included each of the four dimensions, as well as individual items. Findings and Implications: Significantly more Spanish-speaking patients were unable to identify whether or not graft-versus-host disease was present, and reported fewer colds after transplant than before transplant. Fewer Spanish-speaking patients returned to their previous jobs and more Spanish-speaking patients reported not having health insurance. Both groups had highest QOL subscale scores in spiritual well being, with Spanish-speaking patients significantly higher than English-speaking patients. Lowest QOL scores were in social well being, with no differences between groups. Spanish-speaking survivors reported significantly better scores in happiness, control of life, and satisfaction with life. In contrast, Spanish-speaking survivors reported significantly lower scores in coping, and were more fearful of recurrence, second cancers, and metastases. Spanish-speaking patients had significantly more family distress related to the transplant. In fact, family distress was one of the most important items that impacted negatively on QOL. Spanish-speaking patients were more likely to feel they had a purpose in life, and were more hopeful than English-speaking patients were. These and other differences will be presented as a basis for tailoring supportive interventions for individual patients, knowing that differences may be based on cultural background.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:22:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:22:44Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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