Non-Traditional Antimitotic Agents are Additive or Antagonistic in Combination with Vinca Alkaloids

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165666
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Non-Traditional Antimitotic Agents are Additive or Antagonistic in Combination with Vinca Alkaloids
Author(s):
Lobert, S.
Author Details:
S. Lobert, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, Mississippi, USA
Abstract:
Significance: For more than 30 years vinca alkaloids, such as vinblastine, have proven to be effective antimitotics for a broad range of hematologic and solid tumors. Recently, “nontraditional” antimitotic agents were identified using in vitro and cell culture methods. For example, dilantin (phenytoin), an antiepileptic agent, and beta estradiol, the major estrogenic compound, both can inhibit cell proliferation by interacting with the vinca alkaloid drug receptor. It is, therefore, important to predict how these “nontraditional’ antimitotics impact chemotherapeutic regimens. Problem and Purpose: It is not known whether combinations of nontraditional antimitotics and vinca alkaloids are additive, synergistic or antagonistic. The purpose of this study was to quantify the combined effects of vinblastine with dilantin or beta estradiol. Theoretical/Scientific framework: The scientific framework for this work involves well-established mid-range theories. Methodological theories underlie the use of turbidity to measure microtubule mass and analytical theories link microtubule mass to the free energy of microtubule inhibition. Methods: The design for this study is experimental. Antimitotic agents inhibit the formation of microtubules in mitotic spindles. Microtubule mass differences in vitro, due to the presence of antimitotic agents, can be measured by monitoring turbidity (optical density) using a spectrophotometer. This method is commonly used and highly reliable. The dependent variable is microtubule mass and the independent variables are single and combination drugs. Data Analysis/Evaluation: Microtubule mass measurements are used to estimate the equilibrium constant for microtubule formation, K, which is converted to free energy(free energy = -RTlnK). From control, single and combination agent experiments, additivity, synergy or antagonism are determined. Findings and Implications: In combination with vinblastine, dilantin’s effect on the drug receptor is additive; whereas estradiol is antogonistic. Nurses are responsible for anticipating and monitoring side effects and toxic effects of chemotherapeutic regimens. Understanding how nontraditional antimitotic agents may interact with antineoplastic agents is important in planning and safely administering cancer chemotherapy.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNon-Traditional Antimitotic Agents are Additive or Antagonistic in Combination with Vinca Alkaloidsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLobert, S.en_US
dc.author.detailsS. Lobert, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, Mississippi, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165666-
dc.description.abstractSignificance: For more than 30 years vinca alkaloids, such as vinblastine, have proven to be effective antimitotics for a broad range of hematologic and solid tumors. Recently, “nontraditional” antimitotic agents were identified using in vitro and cell culture methods. For example, dilantin (phenytoin), an antiepileptic agent, and beta estradiol, the major estrogenic compound, both can inhibit cell proliferation by interacting with the vinca alkaloid drug receptor. It is, therefore, important to predict how these “nontraditional’ antimitotics impact chemotherapeutic regimens. Problem and Purpose: It is not known whether combinations of nontraditional antimitotics and vinca alkaloids are additive, synergistic or antagonistic. The purpose of this study was to quantify the combined effects of vinblastine with dilantin or beta estradiol. Theoretical/Scientific framework: The scientific framework for this work involves well-established mid-range theories. Methodological theories underlie the use of turbidity to measure microtubule mass and analytical theories link microtubule mass to the free energy of microtubule inhibition. Methods: The design for this study is experimental. Antimitotic agents inhibit the formation of microtubules in mitotic spindles. Microtubule mass differences in vitro, due to the presence of antimitotic agents, can be measured by monitoring turbidity (optical density) using a spectrophotometer. This method is commonly used and highly reliable. The dependent variable is microtubule mass and the independent variables are single and combination drugs. Data Analysis/Evaluation: Microtubule mass measurements are used to estimate the equilibrium constant for microtubule formation, K, which is converted to free energy(free energy = -RTlnK). From control, single and combination agent experiments, additivity, synergy or antagonism are determined. Findings and Implications: In combination with vinblastine, dilantin’s effect on the drug receptor is additive; whereas estradiol is antogonistic. Nurses are responsible for anticipating and monitoring side effects and toxic effects of chemotherapeutic regimens. Understanding how nontraditional antimitotic agents may interact with antineoplastic agents is important in planning and safely administering cancer chemotherapy.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:22:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:22:45Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.