Patient-Assessed Impact of Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea on Daily Life: How Much is Too Much?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165667
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patient-Assessed Impact of Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea on Daily Life: How Much is Too Much?
Author(s):
Martin, A.
Author Details:
A. Martin, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, Pennsylvania, USA
Abstract:
Acute (24 hours post-chemotherapy) and delayed (days 2-5) chemotherapy-induced nausea (CIN) is a common side effect of highly emetogenic chemotherapy. To determine the amount of nausea patients judge as affecting daily life, we examined the relationship of self-reported nausea to nausea-specific HRQoL in patients receiving cisplatin ³70 mg/m2 (n=64, 53.1% female, mean age 52.4) as part of an antiemetic trial of an NK-1 receptor antagonist (MK-0869). A daily diary was used to collect nausea ratings on a 100mm visual analogue scale (VAS; 0="no nausea", 100="nausea as bad as it could be"). Nausea-specific HRQoL was examined during the first cycle using a validated questionnaire, the Functional Living Index-Emesis (FLIE), on the mornings of Days 2 and 6 following initiation of cisplatin treatment. The overall Nausea domain score and three items (ability to enjoy a meal, daily functions, personal hardship) from the FLIE Nausea domain were examined. "No impact" on each item and domain was defined as a FLIE score >6 on a 7-point scale. The percentage of patients reporting "No impact" was compared across levels of nausea (0-4mm, 5-24mm, 25-49mm, and 50-100mm) during the acute and delayed phases with the 0-4mm group serving as the reference group. The % of those reporting "No impact" ranged from 100% for those with VAS scores <5mm to 11% among those with nausea scores ³50mm. Pairwise comparisons among those with nausea ratings in the 25-49mm and 50+mm groups showed significantly lower FLIE nausea item and domain scores than the reference group (Fisher's Exact Test, p<0.001) during both acute and delayed phases. No difference in the % reporting "No impact" was observed between those in the 5-24mm vs. 0-4mm groups (p=0.07-0.28) during the acute phase. During the delayed phase, the % reporting "No impact" was significantly different across all nausea groups defined by peak nausea on days 2-5 (p<.02). These findings indicate that while patients are able to tolerate some level of CIN (i.e., 0-24mm during acute and 0-5 during delayed), nausea rated between 25-100mm has a measurable negative impact on a patient's self-reported ability to enjoy a meal, maintain daily functions and avoid personal hardship.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatient-Assessed Impact of Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea on Daily Life: How Much is Too Much?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorMartin, A.en_US
dc.author.detailsA. Martin, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165667-
dc.description.abstractAcute (24 hours post-chemotherapy) and delayed (days 2-5) chemotherapy-induced nausea (CIN) is a common side effect of highly emetogenic chemotherapy. To determine the amount of nausea patients judge as affecting daily life, we examined the relationship of self-reported nausea to nausea-specific HRQoL in patients receiving cisplatin &sup3;70 mg/m2 (n=64, 53.1% female, mean age 52.4) as part of an antiemetic trial of an NK-1 receptor antagonist (MK-0869). A daily diary was used to collect nausea ratings on a 100mm visual analogue scale (VAS; 0=&quot;no nausea&quot;, 100=&quot;nausea as bad as it could be&quot;). Nausea-specific HRQoL was examined during the first cycle using a validated questionnaire, the Functional Living Index-Emesis (FLIE), on the mornings of Days 2 and 6 following initiation of cisplatin treatment. The overall Nausea domain score and three items (ability to enjoy a meal, daily functions, personal hardship) from the FLIE Nausea domain were examined. &quot;No impact&quot; on each item and domain was defined as a FLIE score &gt;6 on a 7-point scale. The percentage of patients reporting &quot;No impact&quot; was compared across levels of nausea (0-4mm, 5-24mm, 25-49mm, and 50-100mm) during the acute and delayed phases with the 0-4mm group serving as the reference group. The % of those reporting &quot;No impact&quot; ranged from 100% for those with VAS scores &lt;5mm to 11% among those with nausea scores &sup3;50mm. Pairwise comparisons among those with nausea ratings in the 25-49mm and 50+mm groups showed significantly lower FLIE nausea item and domain scores than the reference group (Fisher's Exact Test, p&lt;0.001) during both acute and delayed phases. No difference in the % reporting &quot;No impact&quot; was observed between those in the 5-24mm vs. 0-4mm groups (p=0.07-0.28) during the acute phase. During the delayed phase, the % reporting &quot;No impact&quot; was significantly different across all nausea groups defined by peak nausea on days 2-5 (p&lt;.02). These findings indicate that while patients are able to tolerate some level of CIN (i.e., 0-24mm during acute and 0-5 during delayed), nausea rated between 25-100mm has a measurable negative impact on a patient's self-reported ability to enjoy a meal, maintain daily functions and avoid personal hardship.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:22:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:22:46Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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