Designing and Testing Quality of Life Interventions in the Breast Cancer Population

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165669
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Designing and Testing Quality of Life Interventions in the Breast Cancer Population
Author(s):
O'Mara, A.
Author Details:
A. O'Mara
Abstract:
Approximately 90% of women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer are potentially curable. For these women, issues related to cancer treatment and their side effects are often entwined with issues related to their quality of life and long-term survivorship. Age, treatment modalities, socioeconomic background, and social support play an important role in how women will fare with their disease. Identifying subsets of women at risk for experiencing psychosocial distress and designing appropriate interventions have been the focus of a number of federally funded clinical trials. The purpose of this study was to compare the findings from federally funded research that tested interventions addressing quality of life issues in younger and older women with breast cancer. We reviewed all research projects that were funded from two requests for proposals (RFAs) that addressed research directed at decreasing mortality and morbidity from breast cancer in women ages 65 and over (#RFA CA/NR/AG-91-24) issued in 1991 and in younger women (#RFA CA/HD-93-33) issued in 1993. Among the nine funded projects, seven were identified that specifically tested interventions aimed at quality of life issues. We compared the findings for younger (n=5 studies) and older (n=2 studies) women with breast cancer to identify common problems and the theoretical bases, and to assess the impact of the different interventions. Approximately 1000 women participated in the seven clinical trials. Investigators in each trial used both standardized measures and instruments designed for the specific trial to measure health-related quality of life. The conceptual bases of the interventions varied across the trials. The principal investigators selected a variety of mediums (telephone, videotapes, in-person sessions, booklets, home visits) to deliver and evaluate the interventions. Significant differences between experimental and control groups were not found consistently. Difficulties related to inadequate accrual and high dropout rates contributed to the disparate findings. Synthesis of the research findings and a critical look at the methodologies from these trials can provide a framework for defining the next research agenda for quality of life in women with breast cancer. Recommendations for specific agendas will be offered.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDesigning and Testing Quality of Life Interventions in the Breast Cancer Populationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Mara, A.en_US
dc.author.detailsA. O'Maraen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165669-
dc.description.abstractApproximately 90% of women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer are potentially curable. For these women, issues related to cancer treatment and their side effects are often entwined with issues related to their quality of life and long-term survivorship. Age, treatment modalities, socioeconomic background, and social support play an important role in how women will fare with their disease. Identifying subsets of women at risk for experiencing psychosocial distress and designing appropriate interventions have been the focus of a number of federally funded clinical trials. The purpose of this study was to compare the findings from federally funded research that tested interventions addressing quality of life issues in younger and older women with breast cancer. We reviewed all research projects that were funded from two requests for proposals (RFAs) that addressed research directed at decreasing mortality and morbidity from breast cancer in women ages 65 and over (#RFA CA/NR/AG-91-24) issued in 1991 and in younger women (#RFA CA/HD-93-33) issued in 1993. Among the nine funded projects, seven were identified that specifically tested interventions aimed at quality of life issues. We compared the findings for younger (n=5 studies) and older (n=2 studies) women with breast cancer to identify common problems and the theoretical bases, and to assess the impact of the different interventions. Approximately 1000 women participated in the seven clinical trials. Investigators in each trial used both standardized measures and instruments designed for the specific trial to measure health-related quality of life. The conceptual bases of the interventions varied across the trials. The principal investigators selected a variety of mediums (telephone, videotapes, in-person sessions, booklets, home visits) to deliver and evaluate the interventions. Significant differences between experimental and control groups were not found consistently. Difficulties related to inadequate accrual and high dropout rates contributed to the disparate findings. Synthesis of the research findings and a critical look at the methodologies from these trials can provide a framework for defining the next research agenda for quality of life in women with breast cancer. Recommendations for specific agendas will be offered.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:22:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:22:49Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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