The Effects of Ice Massage Therapy on Peripheral Neuropathic Pain and Sleep Quality in Persons with AIDS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165670
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of Ice Massage Therapy on Peripheral Neuropathic Pain and Sleep Quality in Persons with AIDS
Author(s):
Ownby, K.
Author Details:
K. Ownby
Abstract:
Peripheral neuropathic pain is a unique form of chronic pain that afflicts 10% to 30% of persons with AIDS (PWAs). The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to examine the efficacy of ice massage to reduce neuropathic pain and improve sleep quality in PWAs. A quasi-experimental, repeated measures with three treatment levels design was used for the study. The three treatment levels were ice massage, dry towel massage, and no treatment. A non-probability, consecutive sampling technique was used to select 33 PWAs who suffered from peripheral neuropathies. The order the subjects received the treatments was randomized. Pain was measured with a Visual Analog Scale prior to each treatment, immediately after each treatment, and immediately upon waking up the next morning. The Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire (RCSQ) a 5-item instrument with a visual analogue scale design, was used to measure sleep quality after each treatment in the morning upon waking. The RCSQ was administered to every subjects at the fist visit, prior to the subject receiving the first treatment. Reliability of the RCSQ was adequate with a Cronbach’s alpha of .85. A data sheet was used to record descriptive information. Subjects ranged in age from 21 to 51 years, with a mean of 36.4 years (SD = 1.144) and a median of 36.0 years. The sample consisted primarily of Afro-American (n = 24, 73%) and male (n = 21, 64%). The first hypothesis, there will be a significant difference in peripheral neuropathic foot pain in PWAs who receive ice foot massage prior to bedtime, than when receiving dry towel massage or no massage, was examined using a 2-way within-subjects approach. The hypothesis was not supported (F = 1.51, df = 2,64, p = .237). The second hypothesis, there will be a significant difference in sleep quality in PWAs who receive ice foot massage prior to bedtime, than when receiving dry towel massage or no massage, was examined using a multivariate approach to ANOVA for repeated measures. The hypothesis was not supported (F = 1.95, df = 1,32, p = .159). The power was .37 for the study. The effect size between ice massage and towel massage was .368 when measuring sleep quality. Although there was no significant difference between ice massage and the other two treatments, 15 (45%) of the subjects had a decrease in pain intensity as measured by a VAS. Ice massage did not significantly affect pain or sleep quality caused by peripheral neuropathies. The findings must be viewed with caution, because power analysis revealed low effect size and an inadequate sample size. Although the findings of the study were negative, 15(45%) of the subjects experienced a reduction in pain intensity as measured by a VAS when receiving ice massage. Management of pain caused by peripheral neuropathies is difficult. The results of the study may suggest that a trial of ice massage may be of benefit to some patients. Since ice massage is relatively simple to apply and inexpensive, trying the treatment for a patient who suffers from peripheral neuropathies, may be indicated.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of Ice Massage Therapy on Peripheral Neuropathic Pain and Sleep Quality in Persons with AIDSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOwnby, K.en_US
dc.author.detailsK. Ownbyen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165670-
dc.description.abstractPeripheral neuropathic pain is a unique form of chronic pain that afflicts 10% to 30% of persons with AIDS (PWAs). The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to examine the efficacy of ice massage to reduce neuropathic pain and improve sleep quality in PWAs. A quasi-experimental, repeated measures with three treatment levels design was used for the study. The three treatment levels were ice massage, dry towel massage, and no treatment. A non-probability, consecutive sampling technique was used to select 33 PWAs who suffered from peripheral neuropathies. The order the subjects received the treatments was randomized. Pain was measured with a Visual Analog Scale prior to each treatment, immediately after each treatment, and immediately upon waking up the next morning. The Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire (RCSQ) a 5-item instrument with a visual analogue scale design, was used to measure sleep quality after each treatment in the morning upon waking. The RCSQ was administered to every subjects at the fist visit, prior to the subject receiving the first treatment. Reliability of the RCSQ was adequate with a Cronbach’s alpha of .85. A data sheet was used to record descriptive information. Subjects ranged in age from 21 to 51 years, with a mean of 36.4 years (SD = 1.144) and a median of 36.0 years. The sample consisted primarily of Afro-American (n = 24, 73%) and male (n = 21, 64%). The first hypothesis, there will be a significant difference in peripheral neuropathic foot pain in PWAs who receive ice foot massage prior to bedtime, than when receiving dry towel massage or no massage, was examined using a 2-way within-subjects approach. The hypothesis was not supported (F = 1.51, df = 2,64, p = .237). The second hypothesis, there will be a significant difference in sleep quality in PWAs who receive ice foot massage prior to bedtime, than when receiving dry towel massage or no massage, was examined using a multivariate approach to ANOVA for repeated measures. The hypothesis was not supported (F = 1.95, df = 1,32, p = .159). The power was .37 for the study. The effect size between ice massage and towel massage was .368 when measuring sleep quality. Although there was no significant difference between ice massage and the other two treatments, 15 (45%) of the subjects had a decrease in pain intensity as measured by a VAS. Ice massage did not significantly affect pain or sleep quality caused by peripheral neuropathies. The findings must be viewed with caution, because power analysis revealed low effect size and an inadequate sample size. Although the findings of the study were negative, 15(45%) of the subjects experienced a reduction in pain intensity as measured by a VAS when receiving ice massage. Management of pain caused by peripheral neuropathies is difficult. The results of the study may suggest that a trial of ice massage may be of benefit to some patients. Since ice massage is relatively simple to apply and inexpensive, trying the treatment for a patient who suffers from peripheral neuropathies, may be indicated.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:22:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:22:50Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.