Quality of Life Following Bone Marrow Transplantation: Psychiatric Evaluation of the QOL-BMT Survivors Tool

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165672
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quality of Life Following Bone Marrow Transplantation: Psychiatric Evaluation of the QOL-BMT Survivors Tool
Author(s):
Saleh, U.
Author Details:
U. Saleh, University Kentucky College of Nursing, Lexington, Kentucky, USA
Abstract:
The questionable quality of patients’ lives following bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is well documented in the literature. Post-BMT quality of life (QOL) has generally omitted consideration of the broader range of QOL domains, focusing instead on function-specific QOL. Thus, further research examining the broader construct of QOL is needed toward achieving a complete outcome evaluation of this evolving treatment. The purpose of this cross-sectional, mailed survey was to describe QOL post-BMT and to evaluate the psychometric properties of the QOL-BMT Survivors Tool (ST). Subjects included 41 cancer patients who were at a mean age of 50 years (SD = 11), at a mean post-BMT time of 40 (SD = 42) months. Results suggest that BMT survivors described their QOL as good; however, several functional impairments were reported: physical strength, sexual activities, fear of cancer recurrence, fear of developing a secondary cancer, unemployment, family distress, and uncertainty toward the future. A 7-10 day test/retest reliability assessment of the QOL-BMT-ST revealed the following correlations: physical well-being, .90; psychological well-being, .79; social well-being, .65; spiritual well-being, .67; and total score,.84. Cronbach's alpha for the overall QOL-BMT-ST was .95. Subscale alpha coefficients were .90, .91, .82., .75 for the physical, psychological, social, and spiritual well-being respectively. Concurrent validity of the QOL-BMT-ST was demonstrated with a strong correlation (r = .90, p <.001) with the FACT-BMT scale. Convergent validity of the QOL-BMT-ST was supported with moderate to high correlation with a QOL Cantril rating scale (.70, p<.001), POMS (-.70, p<.001), and PAIS (-.76, p<.001). In addition, The QOL-BMT-ST was able to differentiate between subjects according to their level of pain and level of depression. Findings of the study support the need for structured pre- and post-BMT assessment of physical, psychosocial, and spiritual well-being to identify vulnerable patients and treat them accordingly.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuality of Life Following Bone Marrow Transplantation: Psychiatric Evaluation of the QOL-BMT Survivors Toolen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSaleh, U.en_US
dc.author.detailsU. Saleh, University Kentucky College of Nursing, Lexington, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165672-
dc.description.abstractThe questionable quality of patients&rsquo; lives following bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is well documented in the literature. Post-BMT quality of life (QOL) has generally omitted consideration of the broader range of QOL domains, focusing instead on function-specific QOL. Thus, further research examining the broader construct of QOL is needed toward achieving a complete outcome evaluation of this evolving treatment. The purpose of this cross-sectional, mailed survey was to describe QOL post-BMT and to evaluate the psychometric properties of the QOL-BMT Survivors Tool (ST). Subjects included 41 cancer patients who were at a mean age of 50 years (SD = 11), at a mean post-BMT time of 40 (SD = 42) months. Results suggest that BMT survivors described their QOL as good; however, several functional impairments were reported: physical strength, sexual activities, fear of cancer recurrence, fear of developing a secondary cancer, unemployment, family distress, and uncertainty toward the future. A 7-10 day test/retest reliability assessment of the QOL-BMT-ST revealed the following correlations: physical well-being, .90; psychological well-being, .79; social well-being, .65; spiritual well-being, .67; and total score,.84. Cronbach's alpha for the overall QOL-BMT-ST was .95. Subscale alpha coefficients were .90, .91, .82., .75 for the physical, psychological, social, and spiritual well-being respectively. Concurrent validity of the QOL-BMT-ST was demonstrated with a strong correlation (r = .90, p &lt;.001) with the FACT-BMT scale. Convergent validity of the QOL-BMT-ST was supported with moderate to high correlation with a QOL Cantril rating scale (.70, p&lt;.001), POMS (-.70, p&lt;.001), and PAIS (-.76, p&lt;.001). In addition, The QOL-BMT-ST was able to differentiate between subjects according to their level of pain and level of depression. Findings of the study support the need for structured pre- and post-BMT assessment of physical, psychosocial, and spiritual well-being to identify vulnerable patients and treat them accordingly.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:22:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:22:52Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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