Comparison of Side Effects Between Sentinel Lymph Node and Axillary Lymph Node Dissection for Breast Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165674
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of Side Effects Between Sentinel Lymph Node and Axillary Lymph Node Dissection for Breast Cancer
Author(s):
Swenson, K.
Author Details:
K. Swenson, Park Nicollet Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA
Abstract:
Surgery for invasive breast cancer includes removal and evaluation of the primary tumor along with axillary lymph nodes. The status of these nodes helps clinicians determine the prognosis and guides treatment decisions. Axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) can cause side effects including lymphedema, pain, limitation in arm/shoulder movement, numbness/tingling in the arm, infection, and seromas. A less invasive procedure, sentinel lymph node dissection (SLND), may reduce the side effects associated with axillary surgery, while maintaining accuracy. The purpose of this study was to compare the side effects and interference with daily life of SLND versus SLND + ALND for breast cancer. This two-site study was conducted from the Illness Intrusiveness Framework, in which severity of side effects compromises activities of daily living. The sample included 144 consecutive women who consented to follow-up (mean age of 56.4) and underwent a SLND for breast cancer. ALND was performed if the SLN contained cancer or at the surgeon’s discretion. Side effects were evaluated at 1 and 6 months after surgery with a 29-item questionnaire using 5-point Likert scales rating severity of symptoms and extent of interference with daily life. Content validity was established by a group of clinicians and researchers, and the questionnaire was pilot tested with breast cancer patients and revised accordingly. Analysis was conducted using chi-square for categorical variables and t-tests for continuous variables. At 1 month after surgery, SLND patients reported significantly less pain, arm swelling, arm numbness/tingling, limitation in arm/shoulder movement, and seromas requiring aspiration than patients who had an ALND (p < .05, all comparisons). At 6 months after surgery, SLND patients had significantly less pain, arm swelling, and arm numbness/tingling (p< .05, all comparisons). No differences were found between groups in number of infections. Side effects interfered significantly more with daily life for ALND patients, and they lost a significantly greater number of days from work. This study will provide oncology nurses with information to prepare patients for expected outcomes following surgery.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of Side Effects Between Sentinel Lymph Node and Axillary Lymph Node Dissection for Breast Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorSwenson, K.en_US
dc.author.detailsK. Swenson, Park Nicollet Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165674-
dc.description.abstractSurgery for invasive breast cancer includes removal and evaluation of the primary tumor along with axillary lymph nodes. The status of these nodes helps clinicians determine the prognosis and guides treatment decisions. Axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) can cause side effects including lymphedema, pain, limitation in arm/shoulder movement, numbness/tingling in the arm, infection, and seromas. A less invasive procedure, sentinel lymph node dissection (SLND), may reduce the side effects associated with axillary surgery, while maintaining accuracy. The purpose of this study was to compare the side effects and interference with daily life of SLND versus SLND + ALND for breast cancer. This two-site study was conducted from the Illness Intrusiveness Framework, in which severity of side effects compromises activities of daily living. The sample included 144 consecutive women who consented to follow-up (mean age of 56.4) and underwent a SLND for breast cancer. ALND was performed if the SLN contained cancer or at the surgeon&rsquo;s discretion. Side effects were evaluated at 1 and 6 months after surgery with a 29-item questionnaire using 5-point Likert scales rating severity of symptoms and extent of interference with daily life. Content validity was established by a group of clinicians and researchers, and the questionnaire was pilot tested with breast cancer patients and revised accordingly. Analysis was conducted using chi-square for categorical variables and t-tests for continuous variables. At 1 month after surgery, SLND patients reported significantly less pain, arm swelling, arm numbness/tingling, limitation in arm/shoulder movement, and seromas requiring aspiration than patients who had an ALND (p &lt; .05, all comparisons). At 6 months after surgery, SLND patients had significantly less pain, arm swelling, and arm numbness/tingling (p&lt; .05, all comparisons). No differences were found between groups in number of infections. Side effects interfered significantly more with daily life for ALND patients, and they lost a significantly greater number of days from work. This study will provide oncology nurses with information to prepare patients for expected outcomes following surgery.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:22:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:22:54Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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