2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165675
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Oncology Nurses' Quest for Control: Symptom Management at the End of Life
Author(s):
Volker, Deborah
Author Details:
Deborah Volker, MA/AM, Assistant Professor, University of Texas-Austin, School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USA, email: dvolker@mail.nur.utexas.edu
Abstract:
Because skillful, compassionate care for the dying is not yet widely available, many people are fearful about end of life experiences. Such fears include unrelieved physical suffering, loss of dignity and control over circumstances surrounding dying, and expensive technological interventions that prevent a peaceful death. The severity of symptoms from both malignancy and treatment, coupled with a terminal prognosis, can yield requests for an early death, despite skilled efforts to provide comfort. In a study of oncology nurses’ experiences with receiving requests for assisted dying (AD) from terminally ill patients, nurses shared stories of their struggle to control the timing and circumstances of dying. This report represents further analysis of the data, focusing on symptom management strategies nurses use to attempt to control suffering at end of life. The report adds a subset of respondents who had not received requests for AD, yet were compelled to share experiences with end of life symptom management. Further analysis of data from this descriptive, naturalistic study explored oncology nurses’ use of symptom management strategies to respond to receiving requests for AD from terminally ill patients. Denzin’s model of interpretive interactionism provided the conceptual and methodological orientation for the study. In a national study of oncology nurses’ experiences with receiving requests for AD, 76 nurses shared 72 written descriptions of their experiences, opinions, and practices associated with managing the dying process. Participants were recruited by a randomized, sequential mailing to ONS members. Denzin’s interpretive process was used to analyze the data. To ensure study trustworthiness, the data transcripts and analysis were reviewed by an oncology nurse researcher with expertise in qualitative inquiry. This presentation explores key themes that emerged regarding nurses’ specific beliefs and experiences regarding the use of strategies to relieve suffering and respond to requests for AD at end of life. The findings suggest opportunities to improve care of the dying by skillfully managing discomfort and suffering. Although the nursing profession supports patient empowerment to gain control in other health-related areas, this study revealed many nurses do not support a terminally ill patient’s self-determination in AD.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOncology Nurses' Quest for Control: Symptom Management at the End of Lifeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorVolker, Deborahen_US
dc.author.detailsDeborah Volker, MA/AM, Assistant Professor, University of Texas-Austin, School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USA, email: dvolker@mail.nur.utexas.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165675-
dc.description.abstractBecause skillful, compassionate care for the dying is not yet widely available, many people are fearful about end of life experiences. Such fears include unrelieved physical suffering, loss of dignity and control over circumstances surrounding dying, and expensive technological interventions that prevent a peaceful death. The severity of symptoms from both malignancy and treatment, coupled with a terminal prognosis, can yield requests for an early death, despite skilled efforts to provide comfort. In a study of oncology nurses’ experiences with receiving requests for assisted dying (AD) from terminally ill patients, nurses shared stories of their struggle to control the timing and circumstances of dying. This report represents further analysis of the data, focusing on symptom management strategies nurses use to attempt to control suffering at end of life. The report adds a subset of respondents who had not received requests for AD, yet were compelled to share experiences with end of life symptom management. Further analysis of data from this descriptive, naturalistic study explored oncology nurses’ use of symptom management strategies to respond to receiving requests for AD from terminally ill patients. Denzin’s model of interpretive interactionism provided the conceptual and methodological orientation for the study. In a national study of oncology nurses’ experiences with receiving requests for AD, 76 nurses shared 72 written descriptions of their experiences, opinions, and practices associated with managing the dying process. Participants were recruited by a randomized, sequential mailing to ONS members. Denzin’s interpretive process was used to analyze the data. To ensure study trustworthiness, the data transcripts and analysis were reviewed by an oncology nurse researcher with expertise in qualitative inquiry. This presentation explores key themes that emerged regarding nurses’ specific beliefs and experiences regarding the use of strategies to relieve suffering and respond to requests for AD at end of life. The findings suggest opportunities to improve care of the dying by skillfully managing discomfort and suffering. Although the nursing profession supports patient empowerment to gain control in other health-related areas, this study revealed many nurses do not support a terminally ill patient’s self-determination in AD.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:22:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:22:55Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.