2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165676
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patient and Family Pain Education: Impact on Beliefs and Outcomes
Author(s):
Wells, Nancy
Author Details:
Nancy Wells, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: nancy.wells@mcmail.vanderbilt.edu
Abstract:
Optimal treatment of pain in patients with cancer remains elusive despite advances in the field. Patient knowledge and beliefs have been identified as factors contributing to the under-treatment of pain. Family members may become primary caregivers, and their beliefs are important in achieving optimal pain control. The literature suggests beliefs that inhibit communication of pain to providers and beliefs about taking opioids influence pain control. Previous research has demonstrated that education modifies knowledge and beliefs, but may be insufficient to improve outcomes related to cancer pain. The purpose of this study was to determine if access to information about pain following a pain education program for patient and primary caregiver would increase positive beliefs about pain, thus resulting in improved outcomes of pain management over a 6-month follow-up period. Patients with cancer-related pain and their primary caregivers received a brief pain education program, which emphasized communication of pain to providers and the safety and efficacy of opioids used to manage pain. Patients were then randomized into one of three information groups: (a) usual care, (b) pain hot line, and (c) provider-initiated weekly follow-up telephone calls for 1 month post-education. To evaluate the short-term effect of education on beliefs, patients and primary caregivers completed validated instruments before and after receiving pain education. Patients completed the revised Barriers Questionnaire and primary caregivers completed the Family Pain Questionnaire. Lo9ng-term outcomes were obtained using the Brief Pain Inventory, which measures pain intensity, pain interference, and pain relief. Analgesic use was measured with the Pain Management Index-revised. All outcomes were obtained by monthly telephone interviews for 6 months following the education program. Sixty-four patients and their primary caregivers were recruited. The patient sample consisted of married (66%) white (92%) men (66%) with a mean age of 53 years (range 18-79). Patients had multiple cancer diagnoses, with head and neck (39%) being the most common. Forty-three percent had no metastatic disease. On average, patients had been diagnosed for 12 months (range 1 - 96). The primary caregiver was most often the spouse (64%). Patients and caregivers did show some improvement in pain beliefs pre- to post-education. A significant improvement was found for patients' beliefs about communication with providers but not use of analgesics. Caregivers showed significantly more positive beliefs about use of analgesics post-education. Long-term outcomes of pain intensity, interference because of pain, pain relief, and analgesic use, however, did not differ by information group. Overall, long-term outcomes did improve over the 6-month follow-ups for all groups. These findings suggest that pain education can improve beliefs about pain for both patients and primary caregivers. Providing patients with access to additional information, using a pain hot line or provider-initiated weekly telephone follow-up calls, failed to affect long-term pain outcomes. This research supports the beneficial effect of education on beliefs about pain, which is consistent with the AHCPR guideline. Further research on enhanced provider-initiated telephone follow-up early in the post-education period may provide a better link between education and pain outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatient and Family Pain Education: Impact on Beliefs and Outcomesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWells, Nancyen_US
dc.author.detailsNancy Wells, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: nancy.wells@mcmail.vanderbilt.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165676-
dc.description.abstractOptimal treatment of pain in patients with cancer remains elusive despite advances in the field. Patient knowledge and beliefs have been identified as factors contributing to the under-treatment of pain. Family members may become primary caregivers, and their beliefs are important in achieving optimal pain control. The literature suggests beliefs that inhibit communication of pain to providers and beliefs about taking opioids influence pain control. Previous research has demonstrated that education modifies knowledge and beliefs, but may be insufficient to improve outcomes related to cancer pain. The purpose of this study was to determine if access to information about pain following a pain education program for patient and primary caregiver would increase positive beliefs about pain, thus resulting in improved outcomes of pain management over a 6-month follow-up period. Patients with cancer-related pain and their primary caregivers received a brief pain education program, which emphasized communication of pain to providers and the safety and efficacy of opioids used to manage pain. Patients were then randomized into one of three information groups: (a) usual care, (b) pain hot line, and (c) provider-initiated weekly follow-up telephone calls for 1 month post-education. To evaluate the short-term effect of education on beliefs, patients and primary caregivers completed validated instruments before and after receiving pain education. Patients completed the revised Barriers Questionnaire and primary caregivers completed the Family Pain Questionnaire. Lo9ng-term outcomes were obtained using the Brief Pain Inventory, which measures pain intensity, pain interference, and pain relief. Analgesic use was measured with the Pain Management Index-revised. All outcomes were obtained by monthly telephone interviews for 6 months following the education program. Sixty-four patients and their primary caregivers were recruited. The patient sample consisted of married (66%) white (92%) men (66%) with a mean age of 53 years (range 18-79). Patients had multiple cancer diagnoses, with head and neck (39%) being the most common. Forty-three percent had no metastatic disease. On average, patients had been diagnosed for 12 months (range 1 - 96). The primary caregiver was most often the spouse (64%). Patients and caregivers did show some improvement in pain beliefs pre- to post-education. A significant improvement was found for patients' beliefs about communication with providers but not use of analgesics. Caregivers showed significantly more positive beliefs about use of analgesics post-education. Long-term outcomes of pain intensity, interference because of pain, pain relief, and analgesic use, however, did not differ by information group. Overall, long-term outcomes did improve over the 6-month follow-ups for all groups. These findings suggest that pain education can improve beliefs about pain for both patients and primary caregivers. Providing patients with access to additional information, using a pain hot line or provider-initiated weekly telephone follow-up calls, failed to affect long-term pain outcomes. This research supports the beneficial effect of education on beliefs about pain, which is consistent with the AHCPR guideline. Further research on enhanced provider-initiated telephone follow-up early in the post-education period may provide a better link between education and pain outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:22:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:22:56Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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