Quality of Life Outcomes and Depressive Symptoms Assessed 3 Months After Radical Prostatectomy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165678
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quality of Life Outcomes and Depressive Symptoms Assessed 3 Months After Radical Prostatectomy
Author(s):
Pickett, Mary
Author Details:
Mary Pickett, Villanova University, College of Nursing, Villanova, Pennsylvania, USA, email: mary.pickett@villanova.edu
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to evaluate quality of life outcomes and depressive symptoms in men recovering from prostate cancer surgery within the context of a family perspective. The Family Systems-Illness Model (Rolland, 1994) is the conceptual framework guiding this study. This model includes interactive processes between the psychosocial demands of illness over time and key components of family functioning. Data collection instruments selected for use included self-report scales that have established high levels of internal consistency reliability in cancer patient samples. Depression was assessed by using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), a 20 item scale that measures depressive symptoms in the general population. Eight dimensions of quality of life were measured by using the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form Health Survey (MOS SF-36). Statistical analyses were performed using data collected at baseline and 3 months after radical prostatectomy. The sample includes 94 men who were mostly white, highly educated, professionally employed, and married/partnered. One-third of the couples lived in households composed of 3 or more members. Crosstabulation analyses revealed that almost 20 percent of the sample met the cut score for clinical depression using the CES-D Scale criteria. Chi-square testing of the demographic variables revealed that the presence of 3 or more members in the family household had a statistically significant positive influence on the presence of clinical depression. Statistically significant negative Pearson correlations were obtained between CES-D total scores and the following subscales of the MOS SF-36: physical function, role physical, bodily pain, general health, role emotional, mental health, and social function. Important study findings reveal that depressive symptoms are prevalent among men recovering from prostate cancer surgery and that sustained psychological problems need to be periodically assessed and treated. Clinical implications include strategies to provide assessment and psycho-educational support to assist families master practical and emotional demands associated with the early phase of the prostate cancer illness trajectory.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuality of Life Outcomes and Depressive Symptoms Assessed 3 Months After Radical Prostatectomyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPickett, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Pickett, Villanova University, College of Nursing, Villanova, Pennsylvania, USA, email: mary.pickett@villanova.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165678-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to evaluate quality of life outcomes and depressive symptoms in men recovering from prostate cancer surgery within the context of a family perspective. The Family Systems-Illness Model (Rolland, 1994) is the conceptual framework guiding this study. This model includes interactive processes between the psychosocial demands of illness over time and key components of family functioning. Data collection instruments selected for use included self-report scales that have established high levels of internal consistency reliability in cancer patient samples. Depression was assessed by using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), a 20 item scale that measures depressive symptoms in the general population. Eight dimensions of quality of life were measured by using the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form Health Survey (MOS SF-36). Statistical analyses were performed using data collected at baseline and 3 months after radical prostatectomy. The sample includes 94 men who were mostly white, highly educated, professionally employed, and married/partnered. One-third of the couples lived in households composed of 3 or more members. Crosstabulation analyses revealed that almost 20 percent of the sample met the cut score for clinical depression using the CES-D Scale criteria. Chi-square testing of the demographic variables revealed that the presence of 3 or more members in the family household had a statistically significant positive influence on the presence of clinical depression. Statistically significant negative Pearson correlations were obtained between CES-D total scores and the following subscales of the MOS SF-36: physical function, role physical, bodily pain, general health, role emotional, mental health, and social function. Important study findings reveal that depressive symptoms are prevalent among men recovering from prostate cancer surgery and that sustained psychological problems need to be periodically assessed and treated. Clinical implications include strategies to provide assessment and psycho-educational support to assist families master practical and emotional demands associated with the early phase of the prostate cancer illness trajectory.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:22:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:22:58Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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