Prevalence, Patterns, and Predictors of Weight Loss in Cancer Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165679
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Prevalence, Patterns, and Predictors of Weight Loss in Cancer Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy
Author(s):
Brown, Jean
Author Details:
Jean Brown, University of Buffalo at SUNY, School of Nursing, Buffalo, New York, USA, email: jebrown@buffalo.edu
Abstract:
Weight loss was most prevalent during the treatment phase of illness in a recent chart review study of non-small cell lung cancer patients from diagnosis to last health care encounter, many of whom received radiotherapy (RT). Yet no studies were found that described weight loss in cancer patients receiving current RT protocols. The purpose of this descriptive, correlational study was to determine the prevalence, patterns, and predictors of weight loss in cancer patients receiving RT using a bio-behavioral conceputal framework based on the First Law of Thermodynamics. A retrospective medical record review was conducted for patients who completed RT from 9/1/98 to 8/31/99 at two RT facilities in Western New York. The sample consisted of 152 medical records of patients receiving RT. Patients were included who were 18 years of age and older and were diagnosed with lung, gastrointestinal (GI), head and neck, or genitourinary (GU) (excluding prostate) cancer. Patients were excluded who had a concurrent cancer diagnosis excluding basal cell carcinoma, chronic psychiatric diagnosis, or uncontrolled metabolic diseases such as uncontrolled diabetes or thyroid disease. There were 329 medical records available for sampling. Fifty medical records were randomly selected from each diagnosis, or if less than 50 records were available, all records were used. Data were abstracted from medical records by two registered nurses using a form developed for the study. Interrater agreement was greater than 90%. Data analysis included descriptive statistics and scatter plots. Weight change scores were computed for two time periods: end RT minus beginning of RT and last weight 1 to 3 months post-RT minus end of RT. Multiple regression was used to determine predictors of weight loss during and after RT. Independent variables were selected for the regressions based on significant zero-order Pearson correlations. The sample was 55% male, and the mean age was 66 years (SD 12.22, range 34 to 88 years). There were 54 lung, 43 head and neck, 42 GI, and 15 GU cancer patients with 59% having regional or distant metastasis. Weight loss during RT was experienced by 102 patients (mean –2.97 kg, SD 2.53, range –11.34 to –0.45 kg), and weight loss after RT was experienced by 56 patients (mean –3.28, SD 2.94, range –10.43 to 0 kg). Patterns of weight loss during RT were: 30% lost >2.5 kg, 56% were +/- 2.5 kg, and 3% gained >2.5 kg. After RT, 16% lost >2.5 kg, 37% were +/- 2.5 kg, and 11% gained >2.5 kg. No post-RT weights were recorded for 36% of patients. When weight loss during RT was regressed on age, head/neck diagnosis, hypertension, total concomitant diagnoses, dysphagia before RT, pelvic port, and total RT side effects, the R2=38% (F=8.13, df=101, p<.05) with total RT side effects the only significant regression coefficient. When post-RT weight loss was regressed on pre-cancer weight, total concommitant diagnoses, cough before RT, dyspnea during RT, and infection during RT, the R2=30% (F=4.34 df=55, p<.05) with pre-cancer weight the only significant regression coefficient. These findings have implications for determining characteristics of patients who should be included in nutrition clinical trials and for nutritional assessment and interventions in clinical settings.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePrevalence, Patterns, and Predictors of Weight Loss in Cancer Patients Receiving Radiation Therapyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Jeanen_US
dc.author.detailsJean Brown, University of Buffalo at SUNY, School of Nursing, Buffalo, New York, USA, email: jebrown@buffalo.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165679-
dc.description.abstractWeight loss was most prevalent during the treatment phase of illness in a recent chart review study of non-small cell lung cancer patients from diagnosis to last health care encounter, many of whom received radiotherapy (RT). Yet no studies were found that described weight loss in cancer patients receiving current RT protocols. The purpose of this descriptive, correlational study was to determine the prevalence, patterns, and predictors of weight loss in cancer patients receiving RT using a bio-behavioral conceputal framework based on the First Law of Thermodynamics. A retrospective medical record review was conducted for patients who completed RT from 9/1/98 to 8/31/99 at two RT facilities in Western New York. The sample consisted of 152 medical records of patients receiving RT. Patients were included who were 18 years of age and older and were diagnosed with lung, gastrointestinal (GI), head and neck, or genitourinary (GU) (excluding prostate) cancer. Patients were excluded who had a concurrent cancer diagnosis excluding basal cell carcinoma, chronic psychiatric diagnosis, or uncontrolled metabolic diseases such as uncontrolled diabetes or thyroid disease. There were 329 medical records available for sampling. Fifty medical records were randomly selected from each diagnosis, or if less than 50 records were available, all records were used. Data were abstracted from medical records by two registered nurses using a form developed for the study. Interrater agreement was greater than 90%. Data analysis included descriptive statistics and scatter plots. Weight change scores were computed for two time periods: end RT minus beginning of RT and last weight 1 to 3 months post-RT minus end of RT. Multiple regression was used to determine predictors of weight loss during and after RT. Independent variables were selected for the regressions based on significant zero-order Pearson correlations. The sample was 55% male, and the mean age was 66 years (SD 12.22, range 34 to 88 years). There were 54 lung, 43 head and neck, 42 GI, and 15 GU cancer patients with 59% having regional or distant metastasis. Weight loss during RT was experienced by 102 patients (mean &ndash;2.97 kg, SD 2.53, range &ndash;11.34 to &ndash;0.45 kg), and weight loss after RT was experienced by 56 patients (mean &ndash;3.28, SD 2.94, range &ndash;10.43 to 0 kg). Patterns of weight loss during RT were: 30% lost &gt;2.5 kg, 56% were +/- 2.5 kg, and 3% gained &gt;2.5 kg. After RT, 16% lost &gt;2.5 kg, 37% were +/- 2.5 kg, and 11% gained &gt;2.5 kg. No post-RT weights were recorded for 36% of patients. When weight loss during RT was regressed on age, head/neck diagnosis, hypertension, total concomitant diagnoses, dysphagia before RT, pelvic port, and total RT side effects, the R2=38% (F=8.13, df=101, p&lt;.05) with total RT side effects the only significant regression coefficient. When post-RT weight loss was regressed on pre-cancer weight, total concommitant diagnoses, cough before RT, dyspnea during RT, and infection during RT, the R2=30% (F=4.34 df=55, p&lt;.05) with pre-cancer weight the only significant regression coefficient. These findings have implications for determining characteristics of patients who should be included in nutrition clinical trials and for nutritional assessment and interventions in clinical settings.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:22:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:22:59Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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