2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165681
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Couples Experience of Prostate Cancer: His Work, Her Work, Our Work
Author(s):
Maliski, S.
Author Details:
S. Maliski, UCLA School of Nursing, Thousand Oaks, California, USA
Abstract:
Significance: The American Cancer Society (1999) estimates that 179,300 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer annually. Sixty percent of all prostate cancers are detected while they are still localized. At this stage, after considering treatment options, many will choose radical prostatectomy. Radical prostatectomy renders men incontinent and impotent, at least temporarily. For married men, their wives are an integral part of this experience. Problem: Despite this, little exists in the literature describing what this experience is like for couples. Additionally, this experience is occurring within the context of a cancer diagnosis and the concerns engendered by it, as well as having undergone a major surgical procedure. Understanding the nature of such an experience is crucial for oncology nurses to sensitively and appropriately intervene with these couples. Purpose: Therefore, the purpose of this study is to describe the experience of dealing with prostate cancer and radical prostatectomy for the man, his wife and the couple as a unit. Framework & Methods: Phenomenological principles (Van Maanen) guided the design. Twenty couples who were 3-11 months postprostatectomy were interviewed to elicit their stories of their experience from diagnosis to the time of interview. Couples were recruited from a larger controlled clinical trial investigating “Nursing’s Impact on Quality of Life Postprostatecomy” (McCorkle, PI). Each member of the couples was interviewed separately. All interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Analysis: Analysis was ongoing with data collection using grounded theory techniques (Corbin & Strauss, 1997). Findings and Implications: A number of important themes emerged throughout the trajectory of dealing with prostate cancer. Mastery was a major issue for these couples and much of the work involved in dealing with the diagnosis and its treatment revolved around re-establishing a sense of mastery disrupted by the diagnosis of cancer. The process of re-establishing mastery was one of complex transition as related themes changed over time. Understanding provided by these findings will provide insight for designing nursing interventions appropriate for couples dealing with prostate cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCouples Experience of Prostate Cancer: His Work, Her Work, Our Worken_GB
dc.contributor.authorMaliski, S.en_US
dc.author.detailsS. Maliski, UCLA School of Nursing, Thousand Oaks, California, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165681-
dc.description.abstractSignificance: The American Cancer Society (1999) estimates that 179,300 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer annually. Sixty percent of all prostate cancers are detected while they are still localized. At this stage, after considering treatment options, many will choose radical prostatectomy. Radical prostatectomy renders men incontinent and impotent, at least temporarily. For married men, their wives are an integral part of this experience. Problem: Despite this, little exists in the literature describing what this experience is like for couples. Additionally, this experience is occurring within the context of a cancer diagnosis and the concerns engendered by it, as well as having undergone a major surgical procedure. Understanding the nature of such an experience is crucial for oncology nurses to sensitively and appropriately intervene with these couples. Purpose: Therefore, the purpose of this study is to describe the experience of dealing with prostate cancer and radical prostatectomy for the man, his wife and the couple as a unit. Framework & Methods: Phenomenological principles (Van Maanen) guided the design. Twenty couples who were 3-11 months postprostatectomy were interviewed to elicit their stories of their experience from diagnosis to the time of interview. Couples were recruited from a larger controlled clinical trial investigating “Nursing’s Impact on Quality of Life Postprostatecomy” (McCorkle, PI). Each member of the couples was interviewed separately. All interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Analysis: Analysis was ongoing with data collection using grounded theory techniques (Corbin & Strauss, 1997). Findings and Implications: A number of important themes emerged throughout the trajectory of dealing with prostate cancer. Mastery was a major issue for these couples and much of the work involved in dealing with the diagnosis and its treatment revolved around re-establishing a sense of mastery disrupted by the diagnosis of cancer. The process of re-establishing mastery was one of complex transition as related themes changed over time. Understanding provided by these findings will provide insight for designing nursing interventions appropriate for couples dealing with prostate cancer.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:23:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:23:01Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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