2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165682
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Prospective Study of Patient Sensations Following Breast Cancer Surgery
Author(s):
Baron, Roberta
Author Details:
Roberta Baron, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA
Abstract:
Significance: Many breast cancer patients describe distressing post-surgical sensations and question if these feelings are normal. This phenomenon remains poorly understood. No comprehensive studies have evaluated sensations in patients who have undergone a sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB). This study evaluates sensations over time and with different surgical procedures. By increasing our understanding of these sensations and the impact they have on patients’ quality of life, we can provide comprehensive anticipatory information and suggestions to help patients relieve distressing sensations. Purpose: To determine prevalence, severity, and level of distress of sensations at one week (baseline), 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after breast cancer surgery. Theoretical Framework: This study is based on the research of Dr. Jean Johnson, which indicates that distress during a threatening event is reduced when the subject has accurate expectations about physical sensations to be experienced. Methods: The projected sample size is 300 patients. Patients, during office visits or via a mailed questionnaire, complete the Breast Sensation Assessment Scale (BSAS), an instrument developed by the investigators. The BSAS contains 18 descriptors of breast sensations. Patients record each sensation as present or absent, and if present, rate it on severity and level of distress. The BSAS demonstrated adequate reliability and validity in a pilot study. Data Analysis: Prevalences of individual sensations were compared between SLNB and axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) for breast conservation (BCT) and total mastectomy (TM) by Fisher's exact test. Subscale summary scores and total number of sensations per patient were compared by Student's t-test. Time changes in sensations were compared between treatment groups by contrasting baseline and 3-month responses. Findings and Implications: 242 patients completed the baseline BSAS and 149 completed the 3-month follow-up. Recruitment is ongoing. Type of surgery included BCT+SLNB(48%), TM+SLNB(17%), BCT+ALND(18%), and TM+ALND(17%). The most prevalent sensation at baseline was tenderness (87%). The most distressful sensation, when present, was burning (27% “bothers very much or quite a bit”) and the most severe was numbness (48% “moderate or severe”). Patients undergoing BCT+SLNB reported fewer sensations at baseline and 3 months than those having BCT+ALND (at baseline p<0.05 for 7/18 sensations and p<0.001 for total number of sensations). Patients who had TM+SLNB did not differ significantly at baseline from those who had TM+ALND. At 3 months, however, TM+SLNB patients improved more than TM+ALND patients (p<0.05 for 4/18 sensations). These early results provide important information about prevalence, severity, and distress after axillary surgery. With this information, nurses can more accurately prepare patients for what they can expect postoperatively.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Prospective Study of Patient Sensations Following Breast Cancer Surgeryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBaron, Robertaen_US
dc.author.detailsRoberta Baron, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165682-
dc.description.abstractSignificance: Many breast cancer patients describe distressing post-surgical sensations and question if these feelings are normal. This phenomenon remains poorly understood. No comprehensive studies have evaluated sensations in patients who have undergone a sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB). This study evaluates sensations over time and with different surgical procedures. By increasing our understanding of these sensations and the impact they have on patients&rsquo; quality of life, we can provide comprehensive anticipatory information and suggestions to help patients relieve distressing sensations. Purpose: To determine prevalence, severity, and level of distress of sensations at one week (baseline), 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after breast cancer surgery. Theoretical Framework: This study is based on the research of Dr. Jean Johnson, which indicates that distress during a threatening event is reduced when the subject has accurate expectations about physical sensations to be experienced. Methods: The projected sample size is 300 patients. Patients, during office visits or via a mailed questionnaire, complete the Breast Sensation Assessment Scale (BSAS), an instrument developed by the investigators. The BSAS contains 18 descriptors of breast sensations. Patients record each sensation as present or absent, and if present, rate it on severity and level of distress. The BSAS demonstrated adequate reliability and validity in a pilot study. Data Analysis: Prevalences of individual sensations were compared between SLNB and axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) for breast conservation (BCT) and total mastectomy (TM) by Fisher's exact test. Subscale summary scores and total number of sensations per patient were compared by Student's t-test. Time changes in sensations were compared between treatment groups by contrasting baseline and 3-month responses. Findings and Implications: 242 patients completed the baseline BSAS and 149 completed the 3-month follow-up. Recruitment is ongoing. Type of surgery included BCT+SLNB(48%), TM+SLNB(17%), BCT+ALND(18%), and TM+ALND(17%). The most prevalent sensation at baseline was tenderness (87%). The most distressful sensation, when present, was burning (27% &ldquo;bothers very much or quite a bit&rdquo;) and the most severe was numbness (48% &ldquo;moderate or severe&rdquo;). Patients undergoing BCT+SLNB reported fewer sensations at baseline and 3 months than those having BCT+ALND (at baseline p&lt;0.05 for 7/18 sensations and p&lt;0.001 for total number of sensations). Patients who had TM+SLNB did not differ significantly at baseline from those who had TM+ALND. At 3 months, however, TM+SLNB patients improved more than TM+ALND patients (p&lt;0.05 for 4/18 sensations). These early results provide important information about prevalence, severity, and distress after axillary surgery. With this information, nurses can more accurately prepare patients for what they can expect postoperatively.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:23:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:23:02Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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