2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165683
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Outcomes of Therapeutic Massage for Hospitalized Cancer Patients
Author(s):
Smith, Marlaine
Author Details:
Marlaine Smith, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado, USA
Abstract:
Significance: Back massage has been discarded or lost on busy high tech hospital units where priority is assigned to completing complex medical procedures. Patients with cancer may especially benefit from therapeutic massage because of the fear associated with diagnosis and prognosis, the pain and discomfort related to symptoms and procedures, and the side effects from radiation and chemotherapy. Through studying the outcomes of massage we may support its value as a nursing therapeutic. Problem and Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of therapeutic massage on perception of pain, sleep patterns, symptom distress, and anxiety in patients who were hospitalized for the treatment of cancer. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The study’s was based on Rogers’ Science of Unitary Human Beings and Watson’s theory of human caring. Methods: The study employed a pretest-posttest comparison group design. The sample consisted of 41 patients who and were admitted to the oncology unit at a large urban medical center in the midwest for chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Twenty subjects received therapeutic massage and 21 received the comparison therapy, therapeutic nurse presence. There were no significant differences in mean age, race, sex, marital status, education, employment, or cancer diagnoses between the two groups. Therapeutic massage consisted of three 15-30 minute massage sessions administered by a nurse massage therapist during a one-week period. Therapeutic nurse presence was 30 minutes of interaction with the same nurse who provided the massage, following the same time pattern as the massage practice. The outcome variables for the study were measured on admission and at the end of one week through the following instruments: a VAS for pain intensity and Likert-type scale for distress from pain; The Verran Snyder-Halpern Sleep Scale, the Symptom Distress Scale, and the Speilberger State Anxiety Scale. All measures had adequate validity and reliability for the selected constructs. Data were collected at baseline and at the end of the one-week period following 3 treatments. Data Analysis & Evaluation: Repeated measures ANOVA was used to analyze between and within group differences in mean scores on the outcome variables. Simple effects were analyzed using paired t-tests. Findings & Implications: There was a statistically significant group by pre-post test interaction for pain, symptom distress and sleep quality. A statistically significant improvement in pain and symptom distress occurred for those subjects receiving therapeutic massage. While sleep quality remained the same for subjects receiving massage, it deteriorated significantly for the subjects in the comparison group during the 7-day hospitalization period. There was no statistically significant group by pre-post test interaction for anxiety. The findings support the value of massage as a nursing therapeutic for cancer patients receiving chemotherapy.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOutcomes of Therapeutic Massage for Hospitalized Cancer Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Marlaineen_US
dc.author.detailsMarlaine Smith, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165683-
dc.description.abstractSignificance: Back massage has been discarded or lost on busy high tech hospital units where priority is assigned to completing complex medical procedures. Patients with cancer may especially benefit from therapeutic massage because of the fear associated with diagnosis and prognosis, the pain and discomfort related to symptoms and procedures, and the side effects from radiation and chemotherapy. Through studying the outcomes of massage we may support its value as a nursing therapeutic. Problem and Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of therapeutic massage on perception of pain, sleep patterns, symptom distress, and anxiety in patients who were hospitalized for the treatment of cancer. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The study’s was based on Rogers’ Science of Unitary Human Beings and Watson’s theory of human caring. Methods: The study employed a pretest-posttest comparison group design. The sample consisted of 41 patients who and were admitted to the oncology unit at a large urban medical center in the midwest for chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Twenty subjects received therapeutic massage and 21 received the comparison therapy, therapeutic nurse presence. There were no significant differences in mean age, race, sex, marital status, education, employment, or cancer diagnoses between the two groups. Therapeutic massage consisted of three 15-30 minute massage sessions administered by a nurse massage therapist during a one-week period. Therapeutic nurse presence was 30 minutes of interaction with the same nurse who provided the massage, following the same time pattern as the massage practice. The outcome variables for the study were measured on admission and at the end of one week through the following instruments: a VAS for pain intensity and Likert-type scale for distress from pain; The Verran Snyder-Halpern Sleep Scale, the Symptom Distress Scale, and the Speilberger State Anxiety Scale. All measures had adequate validity and reliability for the selected constructs. Data were collected at baseline and at the end of the one-week period following 3 treatments. Data Analysis & Evaluation: Repeated measures ANOVA was used to analyze between and within group differences in mean scores on the outcome variables. Simple effects were analyzed using paired t-tests. Findings & Implications: There was a statistically significant group by pre-post test interaction for pain, symptom distress and sleep quality. A statistically significant improvement in pain and symptom distress occurred for those subjects receiving therapeutic massage. While sleep quality remained the same for subjects receiving massage, it deteriorated significantly for the subjects in the comparison group during the 7-day hospitalization period. There was no statistically significant group by pre-post test interaction for anxiety. The findings support the value of massage as a nursing therapeutic for cancer patients receiving chemotherapy.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:23:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:23:03Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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