2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165684
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Personal Risk Estimation and Breast Cancer Detection
Author(s):
Facione, Noreen
Author Details:
Noreen Facione, PhD, Associate Professor, University of California-San Francisco, School of Nursing, San Francisco, California, USA, email: noreen.facione@nursing.ucsf.edu
Abstract:
Significance: Awareness of risk is believed to be a significant positive influence on a woman’s screening and early detection behavior for breast cancer. Yet researchers have reported women delaying diagnosis when they fear breast cancer, and no studies have studied cancer screening behavior in relation to estimated risk. Problem and Purpose: This project’s purpose was to test hypothetical relationships between cancer screening behavior and perceived risk, and to examine factors women consider when estimating personal risk of breast cancer. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: This study is guided by socio-behavioral theories of intention formation (Triandis) and decision-making (Toulmin, Montgomery) which predict that health behavior results from a goal-oriented thinking process, and that a culture-based assessment of personal risk should lead to health protective behaviors. Methods: A multicultural, community based, female sample (N=828, ages 19-89), was surveyed regarding: cancer screening behavior, breast cancer knowledge, family history, measures of optimism and fatalism, and estimation of personal risk for breast cancer (“higher risk” or “lower risk” compared to most women). Interviews examined women’s screening behavior and their estimates of personal risk of breast cancer. Data Analysis/Evaluation: Survey data was double entered for accuracy and analyzed using SPSS 10. Interviews were transcribed, and analyzed using argument analysis. Findings: An optimistic bias was demonstrated in personal risk perception, with 75.8% of women reporting that their risk was lower than other women. Age was not a factor in this estimate. The only demographic variable significantly related to perception of higher risk was educational level, with a higher proportion of college educated women perceiving greater risk (X2= 12.302, Cramer’s V = .127, p=.006). Higher estimated risk of breast cancer was not related to following BSE or CBE guidelines, and more importantly was associated with decreased adherence to mammography guidelines. Twelve of the 828 women had two 1st degree relatives with breast cancer, and ten of these correctly rated their risk as higher than other women. Most (62.2%) of the women with only one relative with breast cancer perceived higher risk (X2 = 112.72, Cramer’s V = .387, p=.000; Eta2 =.150). Having a friend with breast cancer was not related to risk estimation. Personality measures of optimism and fatalism were not related to risk estimation, but increased knowledge of breast cancer’s presenting symptoms and fewer cancer misconceptions were significantly if weakly related to higher estimated risk. Implications: Risk estimation is a key cognitive behavior involved in breast cancer screening and detection behavior. This study suggests that more focused research is warranted to better understand how women make estimates of their personal risk for breast cancer and how this risk estimation affects cancer screening behavior.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePersonal Risk Estimation and Breast Cancer Detectionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFacione, Noreenen_US
dc.author.detailsNoreen Facione, PhD, Associate Professor, University of California-San Francisco, School of Nursing, San Francisco, California, USA, email: noreen.facione@nursing.ucsf.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165684-
dc.description.abstractSignificance: Awareness of risk is believed to be a significant positive influence on a woman’s screening and early detection behavior for breast cancer. Yet researchers have reported women delaying diagnosis when they fear breast cancer, and no studies have studied cancer screening behavior in relation to estimated risk. Problem and Purpose: This project’s purpose was to test hypothetical relationships between cancer screening behavior and perceived risk, and to examine factors women consider when estimating personal risk of breast cancer. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: This study is guided by socio-behavioral theories of intention formation (Triandis) and decision-making (Toulmin, Montgomery) which predict that health behavior results from a goal-oriented thinking process, and that a culture-based assessment of personal risk should lead to health protective behaviors. Methods: A multicultural, community based, female sample (N=828, ages 19-89), was surveyed regarding: cancer screening behavior, breast cancer knowledge, family history, measures of optimism and fatalism, and estimation of personal risk for breast cancer (“higher risk” or “lower risk” compared to most women). Interviews examined women’s screening behavior and their estimates of personal risk of breast cancer. Data Analysis/Evaluation: Survey data was double entered for accuracy and analyzed using SPSS 10. Interviews were transcribed, and analyzed using argument analysis. Findings: An optimistic bias was demonstrated in personal risk perception, with 75.8% of women reporting that their risk was lower than other women. Age was not a factor in this estimate. The only demographic variable significantly related to perception of higher risk was educational level, with a higher proportion of college educated women perceiving greater risk (X2= 12.302, Cramer’s V = .127, p=.006). Higher estimated risk of breast cancer was not related to following BSE or CBE guidelines, and more importantly was associated with decreased adherence to mammography guidelines. Twelve of the 828 women had two 1st degree relatives with breast cancer, and ten of these correctly rated their risk as higher than other women. Most (62.2%) of the women with only one relative with breast cancer perceived higher risk (X2 = 112.72, Cramer’s V = .387, p=.000; Eta2 =.150). Having a friend with breast cancer was not related to risk estimation. Personality measures of optimism and fatalism were not related to risk estimation, but increased knowledge of breast cancer’s presenting symptoms and fewer cancer misconceptions were significantly if weakly related to higher estimated risk. Implications: Risk estimation is a key cognitive behavior involved in breast cancer screening and detection behavior. This study suggests that more focused research is warranted to better understand how women make estimates of their personal risk for breast cancer and how this risk estimation affects cancer screening behavior.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:23:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:23:04Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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