Health Beliefs of First-Degree Relatives of Individuals with Colorectal Cancer and Participation in Health Maintenance Visits: A Population-Based Survey

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165685
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Beliefs of First-Degree Relatives of Individuals with Colorectal Cancer and Participation in Health Maintenance Visits: A Population-Based Survey
Author(s):
Jacobs, L.
Author Details:
L. Jacobs, Oncology Advanced Practice Nurse Program, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Abstract:
Significance: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly occurring neoplasms; however, when detected at an early stage, the cure rate for colorectal cancer (CRC) is as high as 90-95%. A family history of CRC is recognized as a risk factor for disease. Engaging in preventive health programs seems to be related to an individual’s underlying motivations, attitudes, and beliefs about health and illness, and a variety of factors influence the extent to which individuals adopt preventive behaviors and utilize health services. These responses have created decision making dilemmas for individuals considering predictive testing for adult disorders whose outcome may or may not be improved by the initiation of early screening. Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive study was to identify variables that are associated with the intention of a first-degree relative (FDR [siblings, progeny, and parents]) of an individual with CRC to participate in health maintenance visits. Theoretical Framework: Health Belief Model (HBM) was used as the organizing framework to guide this study. Methods: These data were collected on a mailed survey to patients (n=1081) diagnosed with CRC under age 60, in 1995, who were identified by the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry. The subjects were the FDRs of these patients. One hundred and seventy-four registry patients and 90 FDRs agreed to participate in this study. A logistic regression model was built and constructs of the HBM and selected socio-demographic variables (age, gender, and level of education) were entered with intention to participate in health maintenance visits as the outcome variable. Data Analysis and Evaluation: The final model consisted of the variables: perceived barriers, perceived seriousness, and level of education. (OR: 2.39 [95% CI: 1.15-5.00]) the more barriers that the FDR perceives to be in the way of having health maintenance visits, the less likely that individual was to participate in health maintenance visits. (OR: 0.41 [95% CI: 0.19-0.87]) the more serious the FDR perceived CRC to be, the better the chance was that the individual would have health maintenance visits. (OR: 0.31 [95% CI: 0.11-0.85]) the more educated the individual, the more likely they will have health maintenance visits. Findings and Implications: Logistic regression analysis revealed 2 HBM variables and 1 socio-demographic variable that predicted the participation of FDRs of individuals with CRC in health maintenance visits. This study provided support for the use of the HBM as the organizing theoretical model for health maintenance intention and behavior research. The health beliefs of individuals at risk for cancer must be identified and understood before effective intervention strategies and research can be planned. These data provide valuable information for planning intervention research with this population.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Beliefs of First-Degree Relatives of Individuals with Colorectal Cancer and Participation in Health Maintenance Visits: A Population-Based Surveyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJacobs, L.en_US
dc.author.detailsL. Jacobs, Oncology Advanced Practice Nurse Program, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165685-
dc.description.abstractSignificance: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly occurring neoplasms; however, when detected at an early stage, the cure rate for colorectal cancer (CRC) is as high as 90-95%. A family history of CRC is recognized as a risk factor for disease. Engaging in preventive health programs seems to be related to an individual’s underlying motivations, attitudes, and beliefs about health and illness, and a variety of factors influence the extent to which individuals adopt preventive behaviors and utilize health services. These responses have created decision making dilemmas for individuals considering predictive testing for adult disorders whose outcome may or may not be improved by the initiation of early screening. Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive study was to identify variables that are associated with the intention of a first-degree relative (FDR [siblings, progeny, and parents]) of an individual with CRC to participate in health maintenance visits. Theoretical Framework: Health Belief Model (HBM) was used as the organizing framework to guide this study. Methods: These data were collected on a mailed survey to patients (n=1081) diagnosed with CRC under age 60, in 1995, who were identified by the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry. The subjects were the FDRs of these patients. One hundred and seventy-four registry patients and 90 FDRs agreed to participate in this study. A logistic regression model was built and constructs of the HBM and selected socio-demographic variables (age, gender, and level of education) were entered with intention to participate in health maintenance visits as the outcome variable. Data Analysis and Evaluation: The final model consisted of the variables: perceived barriers, perceived seriousness, and level of education. (OR: 2.39 [95% CI: 1.15-5.00]) the more barriers that the FDR perceives to be in the way of having health maintenance visits, the less likely that individual was to participate in health maintenance visits. (OR: 0.41 [95% CI: 0.19-0.87]) the more serious the FDR perceived CRC to be, the better the chance was that the individual would have health maintenance visits. (OR: 0.31 [95% CI: 0.11-0.85]) the more educated the individual, the more likely they will have health maintenance visits. Findings and Implications: Logistic regression analysis revealed 2 HBM variables and 1 socio-demographic variable that predicted the participation of FDRs of individuals with CRC in health maintenance visits. This study provided support for the use of the HBM as the organizing theoretical model for health maintenance intention and behavior research. The health beliefs of individuals at risk for cancer must be identified and understood before effective intervention strategies and research can be planned. These data provide valuable information for planning intervention research with this population.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:23:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:23:05Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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