2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165686
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hopeful Adults with Advanced Stage Cancer: Patterns of Hope Over Time
Author(s):
Reynolds, Mary
Author Details:
Mary Reynolds, Idaho State University, Department of Nursing, Pocatello, Idaho, USA, email: reynmary@isu.edu
Abstract:
Living with an advanced stage cancer is one of the most complex and challenging individual experiences of human life that requires multiple coping responses, of those being hope. Nurses are important providers of care during this experience and are in a position to facilitate and nurture this hope. However, there is limited available knowledge and few studies that provide descriptions of hope over time for adults, ages 20-59, with advanced stage cancer. The purpose of this study was to describe hope as defined and experienced by younger adults with advanced stage cancer, evidencing high levels of hope. This descriptive, longitudinal research study used the technique of methodological triangulation (semi structure interview, Stoner Hope Scale, Ferrans & Powers Quality of Life Index, Visual Analogue Scales, and participant observation) to define and describe hope in a convenience sample of 12 hopeful adults with advanced stage cancer. Data were collected overtime once a month for 3 months. By definition, this population exhibited high levels of hope at study entry. Hope scores did not change over time. Four qualities associated with the nature, influences, focus, and patterns of high levels of hope were identified: reliance on strong spiritual beliefs, maintenance of positive attitudes, accommodation of cancer symptoms, and the presence of supportive resource people. The emphasis or importance of each quality was determined and defined individually. Important in this study’s findings for clinical nursing practice is that hope goals are individually defined and are unique to the patient population, influenced by the phase of the illness and the developmental stage of the individual. Hope goals also vary in degree of expectancy and concreteness and require reassessment as conditions change. This research study identifies specific hope goals relative to this population, and provides information that will facilitate nurses in planning and implementing interventions that will help their oncology patients move towards their hope goals.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHopeful Adults with Advanced Stage Cancer: Patterns of Hope Over Timeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorReynolds, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Reynolds, Idaho State University, Department of Nursing, Pocatello, Idaho, USA, email: reynmary@isu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165686-
dc.description.abstractLiving with an advanced stage cancer is one of the most complex and challenging individual experiences of human life that requires multiple coping responses, of those being hope. Nurses are important providers of care during this experience and are in a position to facilitate and nurture this hope. However, there is limited available knowledge and few studies that provide descriptions of hope over time for adults, ages 20-59, with advanced stage cancer. The purpose of this study was to describe hope as defined and experienced by younger adults with advanced stage cancer, evidencing high levels of hope. This descriptive, longitudinal research study used the technique of methodological triangulation (semi structure interview, Stoner Hope Scale, Ferrans & Powers Quality of Life Index, Visual Analogue Scales, and participant observation) to define and describe hope in a convenience sample of 12 hopeful adults with advanced stage cancer. Data were collected overtime once a month for 3 months. By definition, this population exhibited high levels of hope at study entry. Hope scores did not change over time. Four qualities associated with the nature, influences, focus, and patterns of high levels of hope were identified: reliance on strong spiritual beliefs, maintenance of positive attitudes, accommodation of cancer symptoms, and the presence of supportive resource people. The emphasis or importance of each quality was determined and defined individually. Important in this study’s findings for clinical nursing practice is that hope goals are individually defined and are unique to the patient population, influenced by the phase of the illness and the developmental stage of the individual. Hope goals also vary in degree of expectancy and concreteness and require reassessment as conditions change. This research study identifies specific hope goals relative to this population, and provides information that will facilitate nurses in planning and implementing interventions that will help their oncology patients move towards their hope goals.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:23:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:23:06Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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