2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165687
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychometric Re-Valuation of the Home Caregiver Need Survey
Author(s):
Gates, M.
Author Details:
M. Gates
Abstract:
Instruments for use in clinical practice and research require periodic re-evaluation to assure currency and effective use. The HCNS, a needs instruments developed for caregivers of patients with cancer, has been available for ten years. The need to further update and test the psychometric properties of the instrument led the authors to develop a descriptive, survey design for this study. The HCNS was originally a 98 item instrument measuring needs on two Likert-type scales: how important and how well met. The instrument was then revised to 90 items and used by various researchers and clinicians. Findings from users of the 90-item HCNS led to further revision of the HCNS to 84 items based on elimination of replicated items and re-organization into a more logical pattern. The instrument was then printed in a more user-friendly booklet to enhance readability, clarity, and ease of use. To test the instrument, a convenience sample of 441 home caregivers was recruited from 14 agencies serving cancer patients in a two-state Midwestern metropolitan area covering both urban and rural areas. The agencies included an independent cancer service agency, clinics, hospices, home care agencies, and support groups. Following appropriate IRB procedures, the caregivers were asked to fill out the HCNS and a demographic data form that included questions eliciting readability and ease of use of the instrument. Using exploratory factor analysis, the best solution was found to be six factors for the two scales. For the “importance” scale, the six factors loaded in the following order: Information, Psychological, Patient Care, Personal, Spiritual and Household Needs. For the “how well met” scale, the factor structure prioritized in the following order: Information, Patient Care, Psychological, Personal, Household, and Spiritual Needs. Overall reliability for both the “importance” and the “how well met” scales was .97. The reliabilities for the “importance” and “how well met” scales respectively for individual factors were: Household (.86, .86); Information (.92, .91), Patient Care (.93, .92), Personal (.94, .93), Psychological (.95, .94), and Spiritual (.93, .93). The high reliabilities confirmed the need to optimize the length of the instrument. For this sample the highest needs for importance were found in the Information and Spiritual categories. The following need items were ranked highest in importance: access to physicians, honest and updated information, and strong faith in God. The Psychological category had more items with 20% of the sample listing items as not well met in the 1, 2, and 3 lowest rankings. The household help category had from 50-80% of the items listed as “do not apply.” The researchers eliminated any duplications and items not loading on the six factors. The findings will provide a sound basis for further psychometric study of the HCNS. The resulting instrument will be more effective in assessing and planning for home caregiver needs in clinic and inpatient situations.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsychometric Re-Valuation of the Home Caregiver Need Surveyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGates, M.en_US
dc.author.detailsM. Gatesen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165687-
dc.description.abstractInstruments for use in clinical practice and research require periodic re-evaluation to assure currency and effective use. The HCNS, a needs instruments developed for caregivers of patients with cancer, has been available for ten years. The need to further update and test the psychometric properties of the instrument led the authors to develop a descriptive, survey design for this study. The HCNS was originally a 98 item instrument measuring needs on two Likert-type scales: how important and how well met. The instrument was then revised to 90 items and used by various researchers and clinicians. Findings from users of the 90-item HCNS led to further revision of the HCNS to 84 items based on elimination of replicated items and re-organization into a more logical pattern. The instrument was then printed in a more user-friendly booklet to enhance readability, clarity, and ease of use. To test the instrument, a convenience sample of 441 home caregivers was recruited from 14 agencies serving cancer patients in a two-state Midwestern metropolitan area covering both urban and rural areas. The agencies included an independent cancer service agency, clinics, hospices, home care agencies, and support groups. Following appropriate IRB procedures, the caregivers were asked to fill out the HCNS and a demographic data form that included questions eliciting readability and ease of use of the instrument. Using exploratory factor analysis, the best solution was found to be six factors for the two scales. For the “importance” scale, the six factors loaded in the following order: Information, Psychological, Patient Care, Personal, Spiritual and Household Needs. For the “how well met” scale, the factor structure prioritized in the following order: Information, Patient Care, Psychological, Personal, Household, and Spiritual Needs. Overall reliability for both the “importance” and the “how well met” scales was .97. The reliabilities for the “importance” and “how well met” scales respectively for individual factors were: Household (.86, .86); Information (.92, .91), Patient Care (.93, .92), Personal (.94, .93), Psychological (.95, .94), and Spiritual (.93, .93). The high reliabilities confirmed the need to optimize the length of the instrument. For this sample the highest needs for importance were found in the Information and Spiritual categories. The following need items were ranked highest in importance: access to physicians, honest and updated information, and strong faith in God. The Psychological category had more items with 20% of the sample listing items as not well met in the 1, 2, and 3 lowest rankings. The household help category had from 50-80% of the items listed as “do not apply.” The researchers eliminated any duplications and items not loading on the six factors. The findings will provide a sound basis for further psychometric study of the HCNS. The resulting instrument will be more effective in assessing and planning for home caregiver needs in clinic and inpatient situations.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:23:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:23:07Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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