2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165688
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symptom Cluster in Patients with Chemotherapy CTX-Induced Mucositis
Author(s):
Dodd, Marylin
Author Details:
Marylin Dodd, PhD, Professor, University of California-San Francisco, School of Nursing, San Francisco, California, USA, email: marylin.dodd@nursing.ucsf.edu
Abstract:
The next generation of symptom management work resides with furthering our understanding of symptom clusters and their effect on patient outcomes. Symptom cluster descriptions to date have focused on related symptoms whose etiologies have been unknown or multiple (Beck, 2000; Dodd et al. 2000). The description of symptom clusters with a single etiology would further our knowledge. The study’s aim based on the UCSF Symptom Management Model, was to describe the correlation within the symptom cluster of pain, difficulty eating, and difficulty swallowing (fluid) over seven days. 164 outpatients who had CTX-induced mucositis rated their pain, difficulty eating, and difficulty swallowing using a 0-10 visual analog scale (VAS) when they developed mucositis (baseline, TI) and had an oral assessment in the clinic. Patients were telephoned q.o.d. for a week (i.e., Days 3, 5, 7,) and they again rated these three symptoms on the 0-10 scale. The typical participant was female (63%), married (63%), white (85%), middle aged (59.2 years), and averaged 13.9 years of education. The 0-10 VAS is a reliable and valid method for self-rating the intensity of symptoms (Lee, 1989). Patients’ Oral Assessment Guide (OAG) (Eilers, 1988) scores were an average of 13.6 (SD=2.5) at baseline where a normal mouth would receive a score of 8. The average pain scores ranged from 4.5 to 1.8; the average difficulty eating scores ranged from 3.5 to 1.4; the average difficulty swallowing (fluid) scores from 3.1 to 0.7. All three symptoms in the cluster decreased significantly during the week (F = 25.3, p<.001). All three symptoms were moderately to highly significantly correlated at each data collection period. Pain correlated with difficulty eating, ranging from r= .50 to .43; difficulty eating correlated with difficulty swallowing, ranging from r= .54 to .84 (using Pearson’s correlation). This study furthers our knowledge by mapping the associations of three related symptoms with the same etiology within a symptom cluster.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymptom Cluster in Patients with Chemotherapy CTX-Induced Mucositisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDodd, Marylinen_US
dc.author.detailsMarylin Dodd, PhD, Professor, University of California-San Francisco, School of Nursing, San Francisco, California, USA, email: marylin.dodd@nursing.ucsf.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165688-
dc.description.abstractThe next generation of symptom management work resides with furthering our understanding of symptom clusters and their effect on patient outcomes. Symptom cluster descriptions to date have focused on related symptoms whose etiologies have been unknown or multiple (Beck, 2000; Dodd et al. 2000). The description of symptom clusters with a single etiology would further our knowledge. The study&rsquo;s aim based on the UCSF Symptom Management Model, was to describe the correlation within the symptom cluster of pain, difficulty eating, and difficulty swallowing (fluid) over seven days. 164 outpatients who had CTX-induced mucositis rated their pain, difficulty eating, and difficulty swallowing using a 0-10 visual analog scale (VAS) when they developed mucositis (baseline, TI) and had an oral assessment in the clinic. Patients were telephoned q.o.d. for a week (i.e., Days 3, 5, 7,) and they again rated these three symptoms on the 0-10 scale. The typical participant was female (63%), married (63%), white (85%), middle aged (59.2 years), and averaged 13.9 years of education. The 0-10 VAS is a reliable and valid method for self-rating the intensity of symptoms (Lee, 1989). Patients&rsquo; Oral Assessment Guide (OAG) (Eilers, 1988) scores were an average of 13.6 (SD=2.5) at baseline where a normal mouth would receive a score of 8. The average pain scores ranged from 4.5 to 1.8; the average difficulty eating scores ranged from 3.5 to 1.4; the average difficulty swallowing (fluid) scores from 3.1 to 0.7. All three symptoms in the cluster decreased significantly during the week (F = 25.3, p&lt;.001). All three symptoms were moderately to highly significantly correlated at each data collection period. Pain correlated with difficulty eating, ranging from r= .50 to .43; difficulty eating correlated with difficulty swallowing, ranging from r= .54 to .84 (using Pearson&rsquo;s correlation). This study furthers our knowledge by mapping the associations of three related symptoms with the same etiology within a symptom cluster.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:23:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:23:09Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.