2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165690
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Female Patients with Cancer-Related Pain Are At Risk for Under-treatment
Author(s):
Miaskowski, Christine
Author Details:
Christine Miaskowski, PhD, Professor, University of California-San Francisco, School of Nursing, San Francisco, California, USA, email: chris.miaskowski@nursing.ucsf.edu
Abstract:
Recent evidence suggests that women display a greater sensitivity to painful stimuli, report higher levels of post-operative pain, and experience better analgesia with some opioid analgesics. In contrast, the limited research on cancer pain suggests that there are no sex differences in pain intensity scores but that women are at greater risk for under-treatment of pain. The purposes of this descriptive study were to determine if there were sex differences in pain intensity scores, analgesic prescriptions, and analgesic intake in a sample of oncology outpatients (n = 46 men and 88 women) who were experiencing pain from bone metastasis. The patients were recruited from seven outpatient sites and were part of a large randomized, clinical trial that is testing the effectiveness of a nursing intervention for pain management. Women were significantly younger (56.9 vs. 65.3 years) and were better educated (15.0 vs. 13.7 years) than the men. The majority of the women (72.4% had breast cancer and the majority of the men (43.5%) had prostate cancer. No sex differences were found in any of the pain intensity measures (i.e., average, least, or worst pain; hours per day in pain, or number of days in pain) or in the length of time that the patients were in pain. No sex differences were found in the patients’ ratings of how much pain interfered with routine activities (e.g., walking ability, sleep) except for sexual activity. Men reported significantly higher interference scores (6.9 on a 0 to 10 scale) for sexual activity than did women (5.2 p<0.04). With regard to analgesic prescriptions, women were prescribed significantly less opioid analgesics (148.5 mg.) compared to men (297.9 mg, p<0.04). In addition, when the prescription of the opioid, non-opioid, and adjuvant analgesics were evaluated using the Medication Quantification Scale, women were prescribed significantly less analgesics than men (i.e., 50% less, p<0.04). No sex differences were found that women with cancer-related pain are at significant risk for under-treatment. The reasons for this gender bias remain to be elucidated.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFemale Patients with Cancer-Related Pain Are At Risk for Under-treatmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorMiaskowski, Christineen_US
dc.author.detailsChristine Miaskowski, PhD, Professor, University of California-San Francisco, School of Nursing, San Francisco, California, USA, email: chris.miaskowski@nursing.ucsf.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165690-
dc.description.abstractRecent evidence suggests that women display a greater sensitivity to painful stimuli, report higher levels of post-operative pain, and experience better analgesia with some opioid analgesics. In contrast, the limited research on cancer pain suggests that there are no sex differences in pain intensity scores but that women are at greater risk for under-treatment of pain. The purposes of this descriptive study were to determine if there were sex differences in pain intensity scores, analgesic prescriptions, and analgesic intake in a sample of oncology outpatients (n = 46 men and 88 women) who were experiencing pain from bone metastasis. The patients were recruited from seven outpatient sites and were part of a large randomized, clinical trial that is testing the effectiveness of a nursing intervention for pain management. Women were significantly younger (56.9 vs. 65.3 years) and were better educated (15.0 vs. 13.7 years) than the men. The majority of the women (72.4% had breast cancer and the majority of the men (43.5%) had prostate cancer. No sex differences were found in any of the pain intensity measures (i.e., average, least, or worst pain; hours per day in pain, or number of days in pain) or in the length of time that the patients were in pain. No sex differences were found in the patients&rsquo; ratings of how much pain interfered with routine activities (e.g., walking ability, sleep) except for sexual activity. Men reported significantly higher interference scores (6.9 on a 0 to 10 scale) for sexual activity than did women (5.2 p&lt;0.04). With regard to analgesic prescriptions, women were prescribed significantly less opioid analgesics (148.5 mg.) compared to men (297.9 mg, p&lt;0.04). In addition, when the prescription of the opioid, non-opioid, and adjuvant analgesics were evaluated using the Medication Quantification Scale, women were prescribed significantly less analgesics than men (i.e., 50% less, p&lt;0.04). No sex differences were found that women with cancer-related pain are at significant risk for under-treatment. The reasons for this gender bias remain to be elucidated.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:23:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:23:11Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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