2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165691
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Lessons Learned From a Pilot Study of the Enhancing Connections Program
Author(s):
Lewis, F.
Author Details:
F. Lewis, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA
Abstract:
Significance/Problem/Purpose: Thousands of school age children are impacted by the diagnosis of breast cancer in child-rearing mothers in the U.S. annually. To date there is no known intervention that has attempted to diminish the deleterious effects of this acute phase of treatment on the mother’s psycho-social functioning, the child’s adjustment, or the mother’s parenting competencies. Theoretical Framework: Social cognitive theory, self-regulation theory, and a contextual model of parenting were the conceptual basis for the intervention. This theoretical model organized both the intervention and the standardized measures that were used. Methods: A single-group, pre- and post-test design was used to evaluate the short-term impact of the intervention on both child- and mother-adjustment. Both mother-report and child-report standardized measures of adjustment at baseline and at immediate exit from program were used. The program components that were evaluated were five in-home intervention sessions; the Mother’s Workbook; three specially developed Child’s Cancer Booklets; and the child’s “My Story” booklet. Data Analysis/Evaluation: A total of 13 mothers and 13 school age children were successfully entered and exited from the pilot study. Pre- and post-test differences were analyzed on all the mother- and child-related outcomes. Statistically significant differences, all in the predicted direction of higher adjustment, were obtained on most of the outcome measures. Specifically, significant improvements were obtained on the mother’s measures of depression (Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale); both trait and state anxiety (Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory); and the Cancer Self-Efficacy Scale (total scale as well as self- and family-subscales). Additionally, significant improvements in levels of functioning were obtained on the children’s measures of Quality of Parent-Child Relationship; and the Worries Scale (AMMI subscale). In addition, changes in the children’s views of pressures from their mothers’ breast cancer (About My Mother’s Illness-AMMI total scale score) and the children’s Disenfranchised Grief Scale approached statistical significance. The pattern was for pressures and grief to diminish over time cancer as well as a diminution of household tension. Findings & Implications: Evidence from the pilot study results strongly suggest that children may be able to benefit from a psycho-educational multi-component intervention that engages both the mother and her school age child during the acute phase of the mother's illness.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLessons Learned From a Pilot Study of the Enhancing Connections Programen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLewis, F.en_US
dc.author.detailsF. Lewis, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165691-
dc.description.abstractSignificance/Problem/Purpose: Thousands of school age children are impacted by the diagnosis of breast cancer in child-rearing mothers in the U.S. annually. To date there is no known intervention that has attempted to diminish the deleterious effects of this acute phase of treatment on the mother’s psycho-social functioning, the child’s adjustment, or the mother’s parenting competencies. Theoretical Framework: Social cognitive theory, self-regulation theory, and a contextual model of parenting were the conceptual basis for the intervention. This theoretical model organized both the intervention and the standardized measures that were used. Methods: A single-group, pre- and post-test design was used to evaluate the short-term impact of the intervention on both child- and mother-adjustment. Both mother-report and child-report standardized measures of adjustment at baseline and at immediate exit from program were used. The program components that were evaluated were five in-home intervention sessions; the Mother’s Workbook; three specially developed Child’s Cancer Booklets; and the child’s “My Story” booklet. Data Analysis/Evaluation: A total of 13 mothers and 13 school age children were successfully entered and exited from the pilot study. Pre- and post-test differences were analyzed on all the mother- and child-related outcomes. Statistically significant differences, all in the predicted direction of higher adjustment, were obtained on most of the outcome measures. Specifically, significant improvements were obtained on the mother’s measures of depression (Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale); both trait and state anxiety (Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory); and the Cancer Self-Efficacy Scale (total scale as well as self- and family-subscales). Additionally, significant improvements in levels of functioning were obtained on the children’s measures of Quality of Parent-Child Relationship; and the Worries Scale (AMMI subscale). In addition, changes in the children’s views of pressures from their mothers’ breast cancer (About My Mother’s Illness-AMMI total scale score) and the children’s Disenfranchised Grief Scale approached statistical significance. The pattern was for pressures and grief to diminish over time cancer as well as a diminution of household tension. Findings & Implications: Evidence from the pilot study results strongly suggest that children may be able to benefit from a psycho-educational multi-component intervention that engages both the mother and her school age child during the acute phase of the mother's illness.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:23:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:23:13Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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