Relationship of Perception of Radon as a Health Risk and Willingness to Engage in Radon Testing and Mitigation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165693
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationship of Perception of Radon as a Health Risk and Willingness to Engage in Radon Testing and Mitigation
Author(s):
Duckworth, L.
Author Details:
L. Duckworth, Northern Illinois University, School of Nursing, DeKalb, Illinois, USA
Abstract:
Significance: The effect of household radon emissions on the development of lung cancer is becoming an increasingly important environmental issue. Household radon emissions are viewed as great a health risk as second hand smoke is, but this health risk is virtually unknown to the general public. Using the Risk Perception Model as the theoretical framework, this study contributes to filling the void in nursing research on the public's perception of radon as a health hazard and their willingness to test residences for this carcinogen and to employ mitigation methods. The study's purpose was to: (1) build a data set of measured residential radon levels in a single rural county in northern Illinois (DeKalb County). (2) The problem was to determine correlations between participants' demographics, radon knowledge, perceptions of radon as a health risk, and willingness to employ radon testing and mitigation techniques. Sample: A random sample of 420 residences were tested. Participants were selected using a stratified random sample reflecting the urban/rural household distribution from the 1990 census. Data Collection: A survey instrument was used to measure: demographics, knowledge of radon, perception of personal risk, willingness to test for radon and to employ radon mitigation methods. Methods: A total of 1,620 letters were mailed to county residents, inviting them to join the study, and explaining that they lived in a geographic area believed to have high radon levels. Those that agreed to participate were surveyed over the telephone. Data collection was stopped at 420 homes, giving a response rate of 26%. After the survey, residents were each mailed two free radon test kits. Subjects whose homes tested higher than the EPA’s recommend levels were given information on how to proceed in reducing radon levels. Participants were again surveyed on their perception of radon as a health hazard, their willingness to undergo further radon testing at their own expense as well as the likelihood that they will employ any mitigation methods. Analysis: Descriptive, Chi-squared and logistic regression analyses (a=.05) were conducted using the statistic program SPSS version 10.0. Findings: Preliminary findings suggest that 97% of residents are familiar with radon. However, most respondents (75 %) were not sure if radon was a health hazard in their neighborhood. Most were unsure (8 %) or were not planning (48 %) to conduct radon screening on their own and 83 % had never tested their homes for radon. However, early radon screening of participants' homes indicates that 54% of measured levels exceeded the EPA's moderate risk potential level. More alarming are the 31 % that exceeded the EPA’s action level. Nursing Implications: When the survey responses were compared with the radon screening results, it is evident that public outreach programs are needed to educate residents on strategies to prevent radon related illnesses and recognize it as a community health hazard. Nursing research is needed to document the most effective life style/health behavior educational interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationship of Perception of Radon as a Health Risk and Willingness to Engage in Radon Testing and Mitigationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDuckworth, L.en_US
dc.author.detailsL. Duckworth, Northern Illinois University, School of Nursing, DeKalb, Illinois, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165693-
dc.description.abstractSignificance: The effect of household radon emissions on the development of lung cancer is becoming an increasingly important environmental issue. Household radon emissions are viewed as great a health risk as second hand smoke is, but this health risk is virtually unknown to the general public. Using the Risk Perception Model as the theoretical framework, this study contributes to filling the void in nursing research on the public's perception of radon as a health hazard and their willingness to test residences for this carcinogen and to employ mitigation methods. The study's purpose was to: (1) build a data set of measured residential radon levels in a single rural county in northern Illinois (DeKalb County). (2) The problem was to determine correlations between participants' demographics, radon knowledge, perceptions of radon as a health risk, and willingness to employ radon testing and mitigation techniques. Sample: A random sample of 420 residences were tested. Participants were selected using a stratified random sample reflecting the urban/rural household distribution from the 1990 census. Data Collection: A survey instrument was used to measure: demographics, knowledge of radon, perception of personal risk, willingness to test for radon and to employ radon mitigation methods. Methods: A total of 1,620 letters were mailed to county residents, inviting them to join the study, and explaining that they lived in a geographic area believed to have high radon levels. Those that agreed to participate were surveyed over the telephone. Data collection was stopped at 420 homes, giving a response rate of 26%. After the survey, residents were each mailed two free radon test kits. Subjects whose homes tested higher than the EPA’s recommend levels were given information on how to proceed in reducing radon levels. Participants were again surveyed on their perception of radon as a health hazard, their willingness to undergo further radon testing at their own expense as well as the likelihood that they will employ any mitigation methods. Analysis: Descriptive, Chi-squared and logistic regression analyses (a=.05) were conducted using the statistic program SPSS version 10.0. Findings: Preliminary findings suggest that 97% of residents are familiar with radon. However, most respondents (75 %) were not sure if radon was a health hazard in their neighborhood. Most were unsure (8 %) or were not planning (48 %) to conduct radon screening on their own and 83 % had never tested their homes for radon. However, early radon screening of participants' homes indicates that 54% of measured levels exceeded the EPA's moderate risk potential level. More alarming are the 31 % that exceeded the EPA’s action level. Nursing Implications: When the survey responses were compared with the radon screening results, it is evident that public outreach programs are needed to educate residents on strategies to prevent radon related illnesses and recognize it as a community health hazard. Nursing research is needed to document the most effective life style/health behavior educational interventions.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:23:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:23:15Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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