Factors Influencing Patient's Self-Efficacy with Managing Cancer-Related Symptoms

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165696
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Influencing Patient's Self-Efficacy with Managing Cancer-Related Symptoms
Author(s):
Yates, Patsy
Author Details:
Patsy Yates, Associate Professor, Queensland University of Technology, School of Nursing, Queensland, Australia, email: p.yates@qut.edu.au
Abstract:
The continuing expansion of outpatient cancer services requires that nurses identify more effective strategies for developing patient's abilities to self-manage cancer related symptoms. According to social cognitive theory, a patient's self-efficacy with regards to self-management and coping with their disease is one critical factor impacting on the individual's ability to undertake the self-care actions that may be necessary for optimizing their quality of life. The purpose of this study was to identify factors that may influence an individual's self-efficacy with managing cancer-related symptoms, to provide data to guide nursing intervention in this area. The study involved multivariate analysis of survey data collected from a consecutively recruited sample of 219 ambulatory cancer patients from two day treatment settings at one month following commencement of treatment. Self-efficacy was measured with an 11 item scale (alpha=.94). The questionnaire also comprised validated measures of four groups of predictor variables: (1) demographic variables (age, gender, education); (2) disease-related variables (treatment toxicity, aim of treatment, performance status, symptom status); (3) social support (five subscales from the Social Support Questionnaire for Transactions by Suurmeyeijer et al, 1995); (4) patient's beliefs about cancer treatment. Data were analyzed using simultaneous multiple regression. Firstly, each of the four groups of predictor variables were regressed separately to assess their impact on self-efficacy. The five variables identified in these analyses as being significant predictors of self-efficacy (gender, treatment toxicity, symptom status, social companionship support, belief in treatment) were then entered into a final regression model. This overall regression model was significant, explaining 22% of the variance in self-efficacy (p<.001). Four variables were identified in this model as being significant predictors of higher levels of self-efficacy. These included lower levels of symptom distress (sr=-.31), higher levels of social companionship (sr=.21), being more optimistic about treatments (sr=.20), and being male (sr=.14). The results of this study suggest that self-efficacy is associated with a wide of personal and social factors, many of which are amenable to nursing intervention. Such findings highlight the importance of nursing intervention aimed at effective symptom management, enhancing a patient's social companionship, and facilitating the patient's optimism.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Influencing Patient's Self-Efficacy with Managing Cancer-Related Symptomsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorYates, Patsyen_US
dc.author.detailsPatsy Yates, Associate Professor, Queensland University of Technology, School of Nursing, Queensland, Australia, email: p.yates@qut.edu.auen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165696-
dc.description.abstractThe continuing expansion of outpatient cancer services requires that nurses identify more effective strategies for developing patient's abilities to self-manage cancer related symptoms. According to social cognitive theory, a patient's self-efficacy with regards to self-management and coping with their disease is one critical factor impacting on the individual's ability to undertake the self-care actions that may be necessary for optimizing their quality of life. The purpose of this study was to identify factors that may influence an individual's self-efficacy with managing cancer-related symptoms, to provide data to guide nursing intervention in this area. The study involved multivariate analysis of survey data collected from a consecutively recruited sample of 219 ambulatory cancer patients from two day treatment settings at one month following commencement of treatment. Self-efficacy was measured with an 11 item scale (alpha=.94). The questionnaire also comprised validated measures of four groups of predictor variables: (1) demographic variables (age, gender, education); (2) disease-related variables (treatment toxicity, aim of treatment, performance status, symptom status); (3) social support (five subscales from the Social Support Questionnaire for Transactions by Suurmeyeijer et al, 1995); (4) patient's beliefs about cancer treatment. Data were analyzed using simultaneous multiple regression. Firstly, each of the four groups of predictor variables were regressed separately to assess their impact on self-efficacy. The five variables identified in these analyses as being significant predictors of self-efficacy (gender, treatment toxicity, symptom status, social companionship support, belief in treatment) were then entered into a final regression model. This overall regression model was significant, explaining 22% of the variance in self-efficacy (p&lt;.001). Four variables were identified in this model as being significant predictors of higher levels of self-efficacy. These included lower levels of symptom distress (sr=-.31), higher levels of social companionship (sr=.21), being more optimistic about treatments (sr=.20), and being male (sr=.14). The results of this study suggest that self-efficacy is associated with a wide of personal and social factors, many of which are amenable to nursing intervention. Such findings highlight the importance of nursing intervention aimed at effective symptom management, enhancing a patient's social companionship, and facilitating the patient's optimism.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:23:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:23:18Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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