2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165697
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Prostrate Cancer Disparity in Minority Patients: Survey, Plan, and Action
Author(s):
Combs, Ira
Author Details:
Ira Combs, Nebraska Health System, Omaha, Nebraska, USA
Abstract:
Research has documented ethnic and racial disparities in the area of prostrate cancer. Omahealth, Inc., an all volunteer health organization in our community, strives to examine such disparities, find ways to improve the health status of people of color, and thus decrease the disparities. As the population becomes increasingly diverse, it is critical that we learn more about disparities in cancer including why some ethnic minorities are less likely to seek treatment, more prone to cancer, and less likely to survive. Prostate cancer was selected as an area of focus. This included dissemination of information about prostate cancer in an effort to promote early detection and increase the likelihood of a positive outcome with early diagnosis. Activities included combining an informal survey with the distribution of educational materials on prostate cancer. Volunteers approached males in public areas of five community locations populated by people of color. The intent was to collect initial data regarding awareness of prostate cancer and information-seeking behaviors. Participants (N = 120) were 16-81 years old (mean 41.6). Only half (48.3%) of the participants indicated awareness of what prostate cancer was. Of those individuals two thirds (65.5%) could identify symptoms of prostate cancer. Only 14.1% had ever had a DRE. Of those who had not had a DRE, 62% stated they didn't get a prostate exam because of the cost, 20% because of the exam itself, and 18% didn't know they needed one. Common negative responses regarding the exam were the perceived discomfort and embarrassment. Of those that had a DRE, 94% did so based on physician recommendation. When asked who they would go to for information on prostate cancer, approximately half (51.6%) said a medical professional, one-third (31.6%) said family or friends, the remaining chose TV, computer, or reading information. With this information we decided on three actions: 1) Work with teaching hospitals to create free health fairs for prostate screening, 2) Work with minority churches to give out printed information and seminars on prostrate cancer, and 3) Utilize a monthly minority health magazine format to put out the information.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleProstrate Cancer Disparity in Minority Patients: Survey, Plan, and Actionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCombs, Iraen_US
dc.author.detailsIra Combs, Nebraska Health System, Omaha, Nebraska, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165697-
dc.description.abstractResearch has documented ethnic and racial disparities in the area of prostrate cancer. Omahealth, Inc., an all volunteer health organization in our community, strives to examine such disparities, find ways to improve the health status of people of color, and thus decrease the disparities. As the population becomes increasingly diverse, it is critical that we learn more about disparities in cancer including why some ethnic minorities are less likely to seek treatment, more prone to cancer, and less likely to survive. Prostate cancer was selected as an area of focus. This included dissemination of information about prostate cancer in an effort to promote early detection and increase the likelihood of a positive outcome with early diagnosis. Activities included combining an informal survey with the distribution of educational materials on prostate cancer. Volunteers approached males in public areas of five community locations populated by people of color. The intent was to collect initial data regarding awareness of prostate cancer and information-seeking behaviors. Participants (N = 120) were 16-81 years old (mean 41.6). Only half (48.3%) of the participants indicated awareness of what prostate cancer was. Of those individuals two thirds (65.5%) could identify symptoms of prostate cancer. Only 14.1% had ever had a DRE. Of those who had not had a DRE, 62% stated they didn't get a prostate exam because of the cost, 20% because of the exam itself, and 18% didn't know they needed one. Common negative responses regarding the exam were the perceived discomfort and embarrassment. Of those that had a DRE, 94% did so based on physician recommendation. When asked who they would go to for information on prostate cancer, approximately half (51.6%) said a medical professional, one-third (31.6%) said family or friends, the remaining chose TV, computer, or reading information. With this information we decided on three actions: 1) Work with teaching hospitals to create free health fairs for prostate screening, 2) Work with minority churches to give out printed information and seminars on prostrate cancer, and 3) Utilize a monthly minority health magazine format to put out the information.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:23:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:23:19Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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