Improving Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Services in a Comprehensive Cancer Center

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165706
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Services in a Comprehensive Cancer Center
Author(s):
Jones, Karen
Author Details:
Karen Jones, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA
Abstract:
The management of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is challenging in a comprehensive cancer center. Most patients who arrest are experiencing end-stage disease and multi-system failure. Therefore, post-code survival is generally poor. Even so, MDACC is committed to continuously improving CPR services. In 1999, anecdotal reports suggested possible problems related to timeliness of code blue team response. At the same time, JCAHO published new standards requiring effective CPR services and outcome measurements. A multidisciplinary team was formed whose first accomplishment was to map the code blue process in order to identify problematic areas. The document revealed process steps, participating disciplines, functions with unclear assignment of responsibility, and delays in the process. The JCAHO standards and process map were used to develop an aim statement and establish priorities. The MDACC outcome and process measures developed by the multidisciplinary team were derived from the "In-Hospital 'Utstein Style'" guidelines recommended by the American Heart Association (AHA). The key measures led to the development of data collection tools, specifically, the Code Blue Documentation form, the CPR QI Data Collection Tool, and the Post-Code Blue Evaluation survey. The first two instruments provided objective data and the latter tool provided qualitative information about the code. We have experienced numerous improvements to date. The response processes have been expedited using new pagers and an improved paging system. Code team membership was expanded to include the police to direct the responders, a chaplain to support the family, and a phlebotomist to hand carry specimens for immediate processing. All crash carts were replaced and contents were updated to meet standards. An orientation program for the code team was developed. We established our status as an AHA community CPR training center to increase our ACLS and PALS certified personnel. Finally, AEDs have been placed throughout the institution in non-patient care areas. Our quarterly data reveal that our post-CPR survival rate remains stable, the response time appears to have improved, and implementing ACLS guidelines is more consistent. Following the dissemination of outcome information, the number of post-code DNR designations increased to ninety-one percent (91%).
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Services in a Comprehensive Cancer Centeren_GB
dc.contributor.authorJones, Karenen_US
dc.author.detailsKaren Jones, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165706-
dc.description.abstractThe management of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is challenging in a comprehensive cancer center. Most patients who arrest are experiencing end-stage disease and multi-system failure. Therefore, post-code survival is generally poor. Even so, MDACC is committed to continuously improving CPR services. In 1999, anecdotal reports suggested possible problems related to timeliness of code blue team response. At the same time, JCAHO published new standards requiring effective CPR services and outcome measurements. A multidisciplinary team was formed whose first accomplishment was to map the code blue process in order to identify problematic areas. The document revealed process steps, participating disciplines, functions with unclear assignment of responsibility, and delays in the process. The JCAHO standards and process map were used to develop an aim statement and establish priorities. The MDACC outcome and process measures developed by the multidisciplinary team were derived from the "In-Hospital 'Utstein Style'" guidelines recommended by the American Heart Association (AHA). The key measures led to the development of data collection tools, specifically, the Code Blue Documentation form, the CPR QI Data Collection Tool, and the Post-Code Blue Evaluation survey. The first two instruments provided objective data and the latter tool provided qualitative information about the code. We have experienced numerous improvements to date. The response processes have been expedited using new pagers and an improved paging system. Code team membership was expanded to include the police to direct the responders, a chaplain to support the family, and a phlebotomist to hand carry specimens for immediate processing. All crash carts were replaced and contents were updated to meet standards. An orientation program for the code team was developed. We established our status as an AHA community CPR training center to increase our ACLS and PALS certified personnel. Finally, AEDs have been placed throughout the institution in non-patient care areas. Our quarterly data reveal that our post-CPR survival rate remains stable, the response time appears to have improved, and implementing ACLS guidelines is more consistent. Following the dissemination of outcome information, the number of post-code DNR designations increased to ninety-one percent (91%).en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:23:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:23:28Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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