Evaluation of Leadership Strategies Utilized When Combining Two Populations of Critical Cancer Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165707
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of Leadership Strategies Utilized When Combining Two Populations of Critical Cancer Patients
Author(s):
Espinosa, Laura
Author Details:
Laura Espinosa, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA
Abstract:
In December of 1999, the combination of two distinct cancer patient populations in the critical care units (CCU) of The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDA) required special attention and leadership skills. Historically, the surgical intensive care (SICU) and medical surgical care (MICU) units were managed and located on separate floors. As MDA embarked on the utilization of a group of critical care physicians for medical management of the 42-bed CCU, the challenge for cancer nurses was to unify and enlist a true sense of teamwork among these very clinically different and once separate services. Using Deming's theory of teamwork as a conceptual framework for the combination of these two units, unique management skills balanced the staff's strengths and weaknesses. Initially, the name was changed from SICU and MICU to critical care unit (CCU). A nurse manager was hired to lead the unification of the units. With her goal of providing 24-hour management leadership, the single assistant nurse manager (ANM) position was increased by three, while clinical expertise was supported with two clinical nurse specialists (CNS). Agency nurse utilization was eliminated through aggressive hiring to meet core staff levels. Professional teambuilding consultants were enlisted to create a shared vision and mission for the CCU. Subsequent teambuilding events were directed toward establishing common rules and a mutual language to gain a collective CCU ownership and pride. The impact of two years of teamwork resulted in a significant reduction of personnel turnover rates in the CCU. The 1999 CCU separation rate reduced from 16.6% to the 12.5% in 2000. Moreover, the CCU internal personnel transfer rates decreased from 17.7% in 1999 to 8.9% in 2000. Total personnel cost was decreased by $95.00 per patient day. Additionally, the average variable cost per patient day has decreased by $90.00 per patient day. A shared vision, common patient goal, teamwork, and collaboration created a successful environment in which to care for the critically ill cancer patient.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of Leadership Strategies Utilized When Combining Two Populations of Critical Cancer Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEspinosa, Lauraen_US
dc.author.detailsLaura Espinosa, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165707-
dc.description.abstractIn December of 1999, the combination of two distinct cancer patient populations in the critical care units (CCU) of The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDA) required special attention and leadership skills. Historically, the surgical intensive care (SICU) and medical surgical care (MICU) units were managed and located on separate floors. As MDA embarked on the utilization of a group of critical care physicians for medical management of the 42-bed CCU, the challenge for cancer nurses was to unify and enlist a true sense of teamwork among these very clinically different and once separate services. Using Deming's theory of teamwork as a conceptual framework for the combination of these two units, unique management skills balanced the staff's strengths and weaknesses. Initially, the name was changed from SICU and MICU to critical care unit (CCU). A nurse manager was hired to lead the unification of the units. With her goal of providing 24-hour management leadership, the single assistant nurse manager (ANM) position was increased by three, while clinical expertise was supported with two clinical nurse specialists (CNS). Agency nurse utilization was eliminated through aggressive hiring to meet core staff levels. Professional teambuilding consultants were enlisted to create a shared vision and mission for the CCU. Subsequent teambuilding events were directed toward establishing common rules and a mutual language to gain a collective CCU ownership and pride. The impact of two years of teamwork resulted in a significant reduction of personnel turnover rates in the CCU. The 1999 CCU separation rate reduced from 16.6% to the 12.5% in 2000. Moreover, the CCU internal personnel transfer rates decreased from 17.7% in 1999 to 8.9% in 2000. Total personnel cost was decreased by $95.00 per patient day. Additionally, the average variable cost per patient day has decreased by $90.00 per patient day. A shared vision, common patient goal, teamwork, and collaboration created a successful environment in which to care for the critically ill cancer patient.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:23:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:23:29Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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