2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165708
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Utilizing JCAHO Standards to Achieve Pain Management
Author(s):
Feldkamp, Kristin
Author Details:
Kristin Feldkamp, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA
Abstract:
Despite the availability of highly effective therapies for pain, research suggests that 42% of cancer patients do not receive adequate treatment of their pain. Their fear of pain is so great that 69% report they would consider suicide if their pain reached unacceptable levels. Although patients are highly motivated to seek out effective pain management, personal barriers often hinder them. After evaluating the current practice on a large medical center's oncology unit, it was found that patients using opioids often fear possible addiction, side effects, and appearing "weak" or "bothersome" when asking for pain medications. Though nursing staff verbally reassured patients and families about misconceptions and concerns, no written pain education materials were consistently provided. To address these concerns, a two-goal project was formulated. To enhance effective pain management communication between nurses and patients, an educational card was developed. The key components of this card, taken directly from the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organization's 2001 pain standards, explains the rights and responsibilities of the patient concerning pain management and includes the numeric, facial, and color pain scales. These pain scales were also laminated and placed in each patient's room. To assist in providing a more comprehensive educational resource, Pain Control, A Guide for People with Cancer and their Families was used to address barriers patients have to taking pain medication and non-drug therapies for pain management. To evaluate outcomes, a pre-pilot audit was done on 30 charts to assess patient pain scale ratings on admission and discharge and nursing interventions. During the pilot, nearly 70% of nurses stated that the materials led to further discussion with their patients. They also felt patients were more willing and able to rate their pain due to the posting of the pain scales. A post implementation chart audit revealed increased utilization of educational resources and a decrease in patient-reported pain levels. The importance of controlling cancer pain merits high priority. This project has demonstrated that patient education may decrease patient barriers, resulting in pain being more effectively treated. This produces a higher quality of life for each patient.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUtilizing JCAHO Standards to Achieve Pain Managementen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFeldkamp, Kristinen_US
dc.author.detailsKristin Feldkamp, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165708-
dc.description.abstractDespite the availability of highly effective therapies for pain, research suggests that 42% of cancer patients do not receive adequate treatment of their pain. Their fear of pain is so great that 69% report they would consider suicide if their pain reached unacceptable levels. Although patients are highly motivated to seek out effective pain management, personal barriers often hinder them. After evaluating the current practice on a large medical center's oncology unit, it was found that patients using opioids often fear possible addiction, side effects, and appearing "weak" or "bothersome" when asking for pain medications. Though nursing staff verbally reassured patients and families about misconceptions and concerns, no written pain education materials were consistently provided. To address these concerns, a two-goal project was formulated. To enhance effective pain management communication between nurses and patients, an educational card was developed. The key components of this card, taken directly from the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organization's 2001 pain standards, explains the rights and responsibilities of the patient concerning pain management and includes the numeric, facial, and color pain scales. These pain scales were also laminated and placed in each patient's room. To assist in providing a more comprehensive educational resource, Pain Control, A Guide for People with Cancer and their Families was used to address barriers patients have to taking pain medication and non-drug therapies for pain management. To evaluate outcomes, a pre-pilot audit was done on 30 charts to assess patient pain scale ratings on admission and discharge and nursing interventions. During the pilot, nearly 70% of nurses stated that the materials led to further discussion with their patients. They also felt patients were more willing and able to rate their pain due to the posting of the pain scales. A post implementation chart audit revealed increased utilization of educational resources and a decrease in patient-reported pain levels. The importance of controlling cancer pain merits high priority. This project has demonstrated that patient education may decrease patient barriers, resulting in pain being more effectively treated. This produces a higher quality of life for each patient.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:23:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:23:30Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.