2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165711
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Outcomes of a Sleep Intervention Following Adjuvant Chemotherapy
Author(s):
Berger, Ann
Author Details:
Ann Berger, RN, PhD, AOCN, FAAN, Associate Professor, University of Nebraska Medical Center, College of Nursing, Omaha, Nebraska, USA, email: aberger@unmc.edu
Abstract:
Significance: Fatigue and difficulty sleeping are frequent and distressing symptoms in women during and following adjuvant breast cancer chemotherapy (ABCC). Poor sleep adversely affects daytime activity and mood and leads to more intense and distressing symptom clusters. Interventions need to be tested to modify sleep and fatigue and promote recovery following ABCC. Problem and Purpose: There is a high prevalence of fatigue and insomnia in women treated with ABCC. This study examined the outcomes of a sleep intervention consisting of sleep hygiene counseling, relaxation therapy, sleep curtailment, and stimulus control methods following ABCC. Theoretical Framework: Components of Piper's Integrated Fatigue Model (innate host factors, patterns of sleep/wake, activity/exercise). Methods: A prospective, repeated measures design was used for this feasibility study developed by a multi-disciplinary team. Caucasian women (N = 21) had surgery for stage I or II breast cancer followed by adriamycin-based chemotherapy (eight also had Taxol, 10 had radiation, 18 were taking Tamoxifen). They had no unstable co-morbidities, they were between the ages of 43-66 (X = 55.3), most of them had some post-secondary education, and most were married and employed. Reliable and valid instruments were used: Daily Diary, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), wrist actigraphs, and Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS). An Individual Sleep Promotion Plan (ISPP) was negotiated by the researcher and each woman at 30, 60, and 90 days after the last chemotherapy dose, and reinforced one week later. Follow-up occurred one year after the first treatment. Data Analysis: Epi-Info, Action 3, and SPSS data programs. Findings/Implications: Latency, time wake after sleep onset (WASO), sleep efficiency, total rest and feelings upon awakening data (diary & PSQI) demonstrated wide ranges, with means within normal limits for all except WASO. Actigraphic measures of mean activity (mesor and amplitude) slowly and steadily returned to normal by one year. Actigraphic measures revealed frequent (10-11) awakenings/night at early measures and less frequent (8.8) at one year. Fatigue (PFS) ranged from 3.2-3.4 early, and was down to 2.87 at one year. The intervention assisted in promoting activity, obtaining quality sleep, and keeping fatigue levels mild. Reductions in the time WASO are needed and will be tested using an experimental design and a larger sample.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOutcomes of a Sleep Intervention Following Adjuvant Chemotherapyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBerger, Annen_US
dc.author.detailsAnn Berger, RN, PhD, AOCN, FAAN, Associate Professor, University of Nebraska Medical Center, College of Nursing, Omaha, Nebraska, USA, email: aberger@unmc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165711-
dc.description.abstractSignificance: Fatigue and difficulty sleeping are frequent and distressing symptoms in women during and following adjuvant breast cancer chemotherapy (ABCC). Poor sleep adversely affects daytime activity and mood and leads to more intense and distressing symptom clusters. Interventions need to be tested to modify sleep and fatigue and promote recovery following ABCC. Problem and Purpose: There is a high prevalence of fatigue and insomnia in women treated with ABCC. This study examined the outcomes of a sleep intervention consisting of sleep hygiene counseling, relaxation therapy, sleep curtailment, and stimulus control methods following ABCC. Theoretical Framework: Components of Piper's Integrated Fatigue Model (innate host factors, patterns of sleep/wake, activity/exercise). Methods: A prospective, repeated measures design was used for this feasibility study developed by a multi-disciplinary team. Caucasian women (N = 21) had surgery for stage I or II breast cancer followed by adriamycin-based chemotherapy (eight also had Taxol, 10 had radiation, 18 were taking Tamoxifen). They had no unstable co-morbidities, they were between the ages of 43-66 (X = 55.3), most of them had some post-secondary education, and most were married and employed. Reliable and valid instruments were used: Daily Diary, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), wrist actigraphs, and Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS). An Individual Sleep Promotion Plan (ISPP) was negotiated by the researcher and each woman at 30, 60, and 90 days after the last chemotherapy dose, and reinforced one week later. Follow-up occurred one year after the first treatment. Data Analysis: Epi-Info, Action 3, and SPSS data programs. Findings/Implications: Latency, time wake after sleep onset (WASO), sleep efficiency, total rest and feelings upon awakening data (diary & PSQI) demonstrated wide ranges, with means within normal limits for all except WASO. Actigraphic measures of mean activity (mesor and amplitude) slowly and steadily returned to normal by one year. Actigraphic measures revealed frequent (10-11) awakenings/night at early measures and less frequent (8.8) at one year. Fatigue (PFS) ranged from 3.2-3.4 early, and was down to 2.87 at one year. The intervention assisted in promoting activity, obtaining quality sleep, and keeping fatigue levels mild. Reductions in the time WASO are needed and will be tested using an experimental design and a larger sample.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:23:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:23:33Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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