Nurses Caring for the Spirit: Cancer Patient and Family Caregiver Expectations

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165712
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses Caring for the Spirit: Cancer Patient and Family Caregiver Expectations
Author(s):
Taylor, Elizabeth
Author Details:
Elizabeth Taylor, PhD, Associate Professor, Loma Linda University, School of Nursing, Loma Linda, California, USA, email: ejtaylor@hsc.usc.edu
Abstract:
Oncology nurses are increasingly expected to provide spiritual care to their clients. Research findings underscore the need for nurturing client spiritual health, especially for cancer care recipients. Yet scanty and outdated evidence exists to document what spiritual care giving cancer patients and their family members expect from nurses. Understanding client perceptions can help oncology nurses to inoffensively and effectively provide spiritual care. One purpose of this cross-sectional, descriptive, qualitative study was to describe, from the perspective of patients and family caregivers, what are their expectations of nurses regarding having spiritual needs addressed. Conceptually, this investigation was influenced by several scholars (especially, Reed, Frankl, and Travelbee) who have theorized about how and why spirituality is important when living with a health challenge, and Clinebell who identified categories of spiritual need. Methods for collecting data included conducting audio-tape-recorded semi-structured interviews with 27 white or black cancer patients and family caregivers. Concurrent data analysis of transcribed interviews followed Miles and Huberman's approach to content analysis which includes data reduction (coding), data display (categorizing themes after constant comparative analysis), and verification. Results suggest a continuum of client responses regarding nurses providing spiritual care. This continuum was anchored by those who expressed open receptivity to nurses caring overtly for their spiritual health and by others who were adamant that a nurse should not meddle with client spiritual needs. Negative responses to nurses providing spiritual care often reflected confusion about any difference between spirituality and religiosity (e.g., informants frequently equated spiritual care with nurses initiating religious conversation or rituals). Findings also include nursing approaches identified by informants that would "boost the spirit," as well as those that informants perceived would not be helpful or even harmful. These results offer client perceptions about the role and practices of nurses regarding spiritual care. With these findings, nurses can be sensitive and informed while offering spiritual care. Nursing spiritual assessments, indeed, may need to include an assessment of client perceptions about nurses providing spiritual care. Client perceptions of what is spiritual care may need to be reshaped prior to any overt spiritual assessment or care activities.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses Caring for the Spirit: Cancer Patient and Family Caregiver Expectationsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Elizabethen_US
dc.author.detailsElizabeth Taylor, PhD, Associate Professor, Loma Linda University, School of Nursing, Loma Linda, California, USA, email: ejtaylor@hsc.usc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165712-
dc.description.abstractOncology nurses are increasingly expected to provide spiritual care to their clients. Research findings underscore the need for nurturing client spiritual health, especially for cancer care recipients. Yet scanty and outdated evidence exists to document what spiritual care giving cancer patients and their family members expect from nurses. Understanding client perceptions can help oncology nurses to inoffensively and effectively provide spiritual care. One purpose of this cross-sectional, descriptive, qualitative study was to describe, from the perspective of patients and family caregivers, what are their expectations of nurses regarding having spiritual needs addressed. Conceptually, this investigation was influenced by several scholars (especially, Reed, Frankl, and Travelbee) who have theorized about how and why spirituality is important when living with a health challenge, and Clinebell who identified categories of spiritual need. Methods for collecting data included conducting audio-tape-recorded semi-structured interviews with 27 white or black cancer patients and family caregivers. Concurrent data analysis of transcribed interviews followed Miles and Huberman's approach to content analysis which includes data reduction (coding), data display (categorizing themes after constant comparative analysis), and verification. Results suggest a continuum of client responses regarding nurses providing spiritual care. This continuum was anchored by those who expressed open receptivity to nurses caring overtly for their spiritual health and by others who were adamant that a nurse should not meddle with client spiritual needs. Negative responses to nurses providing spiritual care often reflected confusion about any difference between spirituality and religiosity (e.g., informants frequently equated spiritual care with nurses initiating religious conversation or rituals). Findings also include nursing approaches identified by informants that would "boost the spirit," as well as those that informants perceived would not be helpful or even harmful. These results offer client perceptions about the role and practices of nurses regarding spiritual care. With these findings, nurses can be sensitive and informed while offering spiritual care. Nursing spiritual assessments, indeed, may need to include an assessment of client perceptions about nurses providing spiritual care. Client perceptions of what is spiritual care may need to be reshaped prior to any overt spiritual assessment or care activities.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:23:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:23:34Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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