Why Haven't You Gone Back? Predictors of Not Returning for Diagnostic Follow-Up After an Abnormal Mammogram

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165713
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Why Haven't You Gone Back? Predictors of Not Returning for Diagnostic Follow-Up After an Abnormal Mammogram
Author(s):
Bakos, Alexis
Author Details:
Alexis Bakos, PhD, Cancer Prevention Fellow, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, USA, email: aabakos@aol.com
Abstract:
Mammography is one of the most important means of breast cancer screening. It is estimated that as many as 60% of the women who have an abnormal mammogram do not return for further medical evaluation. The purpose of this study was to determine factors related to a woman's decision to obtain appropriate diagnostic follow-up after an abnormal screening mammogram. Cox's Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior was used as a conceptual framework to identify key predictor variables that are elements of client singularity and client-professional interaction. The study used a retrospective design. A convenience sample of 243 women with abnormal mammograms from two urban university medical centers was invited to participate in the study. The study sample included 75 women. Forty-four women who returned for diagnostic follow-up and 31 women who had not returned were interviewed using a telephone survey method to determine which variables predicted follow-up and most accurately classified women into either category. The ages of the women ranged from 29-85 years with a mean age of 52 (SD = 11) and 89% of the women were African American. A majority of women (69%) had insurance coverage for their mammogram. Telephone interviews assessed demographic variables (including social influences, previous healthcare experience, and environmental resources), cancer fatalism (Powe Fatalism Inventory, alpha = .88), anxiety (Trait Anxiety Inventory, alpha = .91), depression (Beck Depression Inventory, alpha = unstable estimate), perceived cancer screening experience (Screening Satisfaction Scale, alpha = .76), and mammography induced pain (Painometer-Words, internal consistency reliability = n/a). Data were analyzed using chi-square, ANOVA, and logistic regression to aid in prediction. The results suggest that women who had greater cancer fatalism and depression, experienced less mammography induced pain, were age 50 years or younger, and had less perceived breast cancer risk, had significantly greater odds of not returning for diagnostic follow-up (model chi-square = 47.94, df = 10, p = .000). The logistic regression model correctly classified 81% of the women on the outcome variable. The findings can be used by nurses in cancer detection to increase awareness of those at risk for not returning and test suggested intervention strategies to improve diagnostic follow-up after an abnormal screening mammogram.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhy Haven't You Gone Back? Predictors of Not Returning for Diagnostic Follow-Up After an Abnormal Mammogramen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBakos, Alexisen_US
dc.author.detailsAlexis Bakos, PhD, Cancer Prevention Fellow, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, USA, email: aabakos@aol.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165713-
dc.description.abstractMammography is one of the most important means of breast cancer screening. It is estimated that as many as 60% of the women who have an abnormal mammogram do not return for further medical evaluation. The purpose of this study was to determine factors related to a woman's decision to obtain appropriate diagnostic follow-up after an abnormal screening mammogram. Cox's Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior was used as a conceptual framework to identify key predictor variables that are elements of client singularity and client-professional interaction. The study used a retrospective design. A convenience sample of 243 women with abnormal mammograms from two urban university medical centers was invited to participate in the study. The study sample included 75 women. Forty-four women who returned for diagnostic follow-up and 31 women who had not returned were interviewed using a telephone survey method to determine which variables predicted follow-up and most accurately classified women into either category. The ages of the women ranged from 29-85 years with a mean age of 52 (SD = 11) and 89% of the women were African American. A majority of women (69%) had insurance coverage for their mammogram. Telephone interviews assessed demographic variables (including social influences, previous healthcare experience, and environmental resources), cancer fatalism (Powe Fatalism Inventory, alpha = .88), anxiety (Trait Anxiety Inventory, alpha = .91), depression (Beck Depression Inventory, alpha = unstable estimate), perceived cancer screening experience (Screening Satisfaction Scale, alpha = .76), and mammography induced pain (Painometer-Words, internal consistency reliability = n/a). Data were analyzed using chi-square, ANOVA, and logistic regression to aid in prediction. The results suggest that women who had greater cancer fatalism and depression, experienced less mammography induced pain, were age 50 years or younger, and had less perceived breast cancer risk, had significantly greater odds of not returning for diagnostic follow-up (model chi-square = 47.94, df = 10, p = .000). The logistic regression model correctly classified 81% of the women on the outcome variable. The findings can be used by nurses in cancer detection to increase awareness of those at risk for not returning and test suggested intervention strategies to improve diagnostic follow-up after an abnormal screening mammogram.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:23:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:23:35Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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