The Long and Winding Road of the Advanced Practice Nurse (APN): Integrating Palliative Care Early in Cancer Treatment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165716
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Long and Winding Road of the Advanced Practice Nurse (APN): Integrating Palliative Care Early in Cancer Treatment
Author(s):
Indelicato, Rose
Author Details:
Rose Indelicato, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York, USA
Abstract:
Topic: Palliative care can provide physical, psychological, and spiritual support for patients and caregivers at every stage of cancer treatment. At present, however, the need for palliative care often goes unnoticed until patients become terminally ill. This presentation will highlight how one facility has incorporated the unique talents of a group of advanced practice nurses (APNs) in the provision of comprehensive palliative care across many clinical settings and stages of disease. Rationale: The ONS position paper asserts that "APNs are a vital component of the healthcare team that provides care to patients with cancer, and the role is essential to providing cost-effective, quality care for diverse populations." Interventions: We will describe the multi-faceted roles of APNs in a department of pain medicine and palliative care (DPMPC) at a 710-bed lower Manhattan hospital with a diverse patient population. In addition to education and research, APN clinical activities include DPMPC clinic sessions (NP and CNS), outpatient cancer and fatigue centers, telephone-based case management, and providing continuity of care between active cancer treatment and end-of-life care through hospice. We will highlight the APN in the provision of palliative care early in the course of disease by illustrating areas of clinician expertise in pain and symptom management, home care, hospice, psychiatric nursing, chemical dependency, and complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) therapies. We will discuss barriers faced in providing palliative care such as reimbursement issues, provider limited expertise in symptom management, and lack of comfort in discussing advance directives and goal of care; patient/caregiver equating palliative care with "suboptimal" care; the inconsistencies between cultural/religious beliefs and the ability to offer quality symptom control. Through case presentations, we will show the impact that APNs can have on implementing early palliative care. Interpretation/Discussion: APNs are poised to bring palliative care into patient management early in the cancer trajectory. Patients and caregivers can be better served if oncology nurses communicate, from the start, that palliative care, with its focus on quality of life, is as essential to ongoing patient care as is treatment for the underlying disease.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Long and Winding Road of the Advanced Practice Nurse (APN): Integrating Palliative Care Early in Cancer Treatmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorIndelicato, Roseen_US
dc.author.detailsRose Indelicato, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165716-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Palliative care can provide physical, psychological, and spiritual support for patients and caregivers at every stage of cancer treatment. At present, however, the need for palliative care often goes unnoticed until patients become terminally ill. This presentation will highlight how one facility has incorporated the unique talents of a group of advanced practice nurses (APNs) in the provision of comprehensive palliative care across many clinical settings and stages of disease. Rationale: The ONS position paper asserts that "APNs are a vital component of the healthcare team that provides care to patients with cancer, and the role is essential to providing cost-effective, quality care for diverse populations." Interventions: We will describe the multi-faceted roles of APNs in a department of pain medicine and palliative care (DPMPC) at a 710-bed lower Manhattan hospital with a diverse patient population. In addition to education and research, APN clinical activities include DPMPC clinic sessions (NP and CNS), outpatient cancer and fatigue centers, telephone-based case management, and providing continuity of care between active cancer treatment and end-of-life care through hospice. We will highlight the APN in the provision of palliative care early in the course of disease by illustrating areas of clinician expertise in pain and symptom management, home care, hospice, psychiatric nursing, chemical dependency, and complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) therapies. We will discuss barriers faced in providing palliative care such as reimbursement issues, provider limited expertise in symptom management, and lack of comfort in discussing advance directives and goal of care; patient/caregiver equating palliative care with "suboptimal" care; the inconsistencies between cultural/religious beliefs and the ability to offer quality symptom control. Through case presentations, we will show the impact that APNs can have on implementing early palliative care. Interpretation/Discussion: APNs are poised to bring palliative care into patient management early in the cancer trajectory. Patients and caregivers can be better served if oncology nurses communicate, from the start, that palliative care, with its focus on quality of life, is as essential to ongoing patient care as is treatment for the underlying disease.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:23:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:23:38Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.