2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165717
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Living With Dying: Spirituality at the End of Life
Author(s):
Stephenson, Pamela
Author Details:
Pamela Stephenson, Forum Health Cancer Care Center, Northside Hospital, Youngstown, Ohio, USA
Abstract:
Little is known about the experience of spirituality in the lives of hospice patients despite the fact that it is during the end of life that spiritual development is thought to be of central concern to patients. Nurses report feeling unprepared to address spiritual needs because they lack an understanding of the meaning of spirituality in the lives of hospice patients (Taylor, Highfield, & Amenta, 1999). This study used interpretive phenomenology to explore the experience of spirituality from the perspective of the hospice patient (Benner, 1994). Unstructured, in-depth interviews, during which participants were asked to describe the experience of spirituality in their lives were conducted with six hospice patients. A four-member interpretive team analyzed the data using the strategies outlined by Diekelmann, Allen, and Tanner (1989). All the participants shared stories about spirituality and dying that were consistent with their views about spirituality throughout their lives. They did not demonstrate any significant spiritual transformations when they learned they were dying. Two sub-themes emerged from the data which indicated what issues were most important to the participants as death approached. The first sub-theme of "who is in charge" reflected the participants' consistency regarding who was in charge of their life, illness, and dying, be it themselves and/or God. The second sub-theme of "connecting and disconnecting" revealed the importance of joining with either other humans and/or God throughout life and in death. The participants' expectation of nurses was not to participate in spiritual tasks or to engage in in-depth spiritual dialogue, but to reinforce their sense of spirituality, to display the "good" qualities of humankind. These findings suggest that nurses should respect the patients struggle to determine who is in charge and, rather than perform "spiritual tasks," and provide a meaningful connection to the dying patient.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLiving With Dying: Spirituality at the End of Lifeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStephenson, Pamelaen_US
dc.author.detailsPamela Stephenson, Forum Health Cancer Care Center, Northside Hospital, Youngstown, Ohio, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165717-
dc.description.abstractLittle is known about the experience of spirituality in the lives of hospice patients despite the fact that it is during the end of life that spiritual development is thought to be of central concern to patients. Nurses report feeling unprepared to address spiritual needs because they lack an understanding of the meaning of spirituality in the lives of hospice patients (Taylor, Highfield, & Amenta, 1999). This study used interpretive phenomenology to explore the experience of spirituality from the perspective of the hospice patient (Benner, 1994). Unstructured, in-depth interviews, during which participants were asked to describe the experience of spirituality in their lives were conducted with six hospice patients. A four-member interpretive team analyzed the data using the strategies outlined by Diekelmann, Allen, and Tanner (1989). All the participants shared stories about spirituality and dying that were consistent with their views about spirituality throughout their lives. They did not demonstrate any significant spiritual transformations when they learned they were dying. Two sub-themes emerged from the data which indicated what issues were most important to the participants as death approached. The first sub-theme of "who is in charge" reflected the participants' consistency regarding who was in charge of their life, illness, and dying, be it themselves and/or God. The second sub-theme of "connecting and disconnecting" revealed the importance of joining with either other humans and/or God throughout life and in death. The participants' expectation of nurses was not to participate in spiritual tasks or to engage in in-depth spiritual dialogue, but to reinforce their sense of spirituality, to display the "good" qualities of humankind. These findings suggest that nurses should respect the patients struggle to determine who is in charge and, rather than perform "spiritual tasks," and provide a meaningful connection to the dying patient.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:23:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:23:39Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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