2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165720
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Map of Decisions to Delay Breast Symptom Evaluation
Author(s):
Facione, Noreen
Author Details:
Noreen Facione, PhD, Associate Professor, University of California-San Francisco, School of Nursing, San Francisco, California, USA, email: noreen.facione@nursing.ucsf.ed
Abstract:
Problem and Purpose: Early diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer requires women to appraise their self-discovered symptoms as posing the threat of breast cancer and to decide to seek immediate evaluation from a provider. Research has shown that this appraisal and decision process is a reflective judgment process influenced by social and psychological variables. Theory: This cognitive decision-making process results in a confidence that one is making good judgments about cancer risk. However, the symptom appraisal and decision process itself has not been adequately studied. Cognitive theory grounds this study of women currently experiencing breast symptoms. Methods: In depth interviews were conducted in the homes of 25 symptomatic women recruited in a community-based study of breast health behavior. The sample women were Latino (36%), Black (16%), and White (48%). They ranged in age from 24-72 years (mean = 40.0 years, sd = 16.5), and varied across income levels. Analysis: This study used two analytical methods (content and argument analysis) to analyze the content and the reasoning process in these interviews. Decision maps were then constructed to display the thinking processes involved in each woman's symptom appraisal and to display each woman's decision about whether or when to seek evaluation. The 25 decision maps were then compared for similar reasoning patterns. Findings and Implications for Practice: In five of the interviews, women appraised their symptoms as cancer and sought immediate evaluation. In seven of the other interviews, women attributed their symptoms to cancer and yet were among the 10 (40%) of the women who decided to delay seeking evaluation. The analyzed decision processes and analysis of the aptitudes and knowledge used in these decisions explained women's appraisal as malignant or benign, and their subsequent decisions to delay, even when they attributed the symptom to breast cancer. The findings suggest new clinical approaches for counseling women about the risk of delaying the evaluation of self-discovered breast symptoms and new media approaches for early cancer detection.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Map of Decisions to Delay Breast Symptom Evaluationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFacione, Noreenen_US
dc.author.detailsNoreen Facione, PhD, Associate Professor, University of California-San Francisco, School of Nursing, San Francisco, California, USA, email: noreen.facione@nursing.ucsf.eden_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165720-
dc.description.abstractProblem and Purpose: Early diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer requires women to appraise their self-discovered symptoms as posing the threat of breast cancer and to decide to seek immediate evaluation from a provider. Research has shown that this appraisal and decision process is a reflective judgment process influenced by social and psychological variables. Theory: This cognitive decision-making process results in a confidence that one is making good judgments about cancer risk. However, the symptom appraisal and decision process itself has not been adequately studied. Cognitive theory grounds this study of women currently experiencing breast symptoms. Methods: In depth interviews were conducted in the homes of 25 symptomatic women recruited in a community-based study of breast health behavior. The sample women were Latino (36%), Black (16%), and White (48%). They ranged in age from 24-72 years (mean = 40.0 years, sd = 16.5), and varied across income levels. Analysis: This study used two analytical methods (content and argument analysis) to analyze the content and the reasoning process in these interviews. Decision maps were then constructed to display the thinking processes involved in each woman's symptom appraisal and to display each woman's decision about whether or when to seek evaluation. The 25 decision maps were then compared for similar reasoning patterns. Findings and Implications for Practice: In five of the interviews, women appraised their symptoms as cancer and sought immediate evaluation. In seven of the other interviews, women attributed their symptoms to cancer and yet were among the 10 (40%) of the women who decided to delay seeking evaluation. The analyzed decision processes and analysis of the aptitudes and knowledge used in these decisions explained women's appraisal as malignant or benign, and their subsequent decisions to delay, even when they attributed the symptom to breast cancer. The findings suggest new clinical approaches for counseling women about the risk of delaying the evaluation of self-discovered breast symptoms and new media approaches for early cancer detection.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:23:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:23:42Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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