The Nature of Change: Using the Functional Performance Index (FPI) With Patients Undergoing Cancer Treatment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165725
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Nature of Change: Using the Functional Performance Index (FPI) With Patients Undergoing Cancer Treatment
Author(s):
Nail, Lillian
Author Details:
Lillian Nail, PhD, Professor, Oregon Health & Science University, School of Nursing, Portland, Oregon, USA, email: naill@ohsu.edu
Abstract:
Although function is widely recognized as an important quality-of-life outcome, there is little information about types of activities that are compromised during cancer treatment. The purpose of this analysis was to describe the nature of self-reported functional impairment in patients beginning treatment with chemotherapy or radiation therapy and examine changes in function over the first few weeks of treatment. This study was guided by concepts suggested by self-regulation theory. An instrument that contains 65 detailed activity items, the FPI, was used. The FPI was developed as a measure of function for use with patients with COPD and has demonstrated reliability and validity in COPD (Leidy, 1999). In order to capture the nature of activity changes in cancer patients, 100 subjects participating in an RCT of an energy conservation intervention completed the FPI at the beginning of cancer treatment and several weeks later during treatment. The typical subject was a middle-aged (M = 56.7 years), married (74%), woman (87%) with breast cancer (79%). At the beginning of treatment, 55 subjects ranked body care as the most or second-most important area of function, followed by social interaction (n = 42) and household maintenance (n = 32). As expected, few subjects reported activities as causing much difficulty. Activities requiring large muscle movement and stretching, like carrying groceries, painting, cleaning, or golf presented challenges to a few (<10) subjects. Changes in function over time were examined using paired t-tests computed on FPI subscale scores from baseline to during treatment measures within the control group (n = 54) only as the energy conservation intervention is expected to influence activity in the experimental group. There was a trend (p = .053) for physical activity to decline as treatment progressed. Recreational activity decreased over time (p = .019), but there were no changes in self-reported body care, household maintenance, and social interaction. The findings of these analyses indicate that changes in function are in areas other than personal care ADLs and suggest that measures of function in cancer patients need to encompass recreational and physical activity as well as traditional ADL items. Implications for measuring function, including gender-based items, preference, and attributions will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Nature of Change: Using the Functional Performance Index (FPI) With Patients Undergoing Cancer Treatmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorNail, Lillianen_US
dc.author.detailsLillian Nail, PhD, Professor, Oregon Health & Science University, School of Nursing, Portland, Oregon, USA, email: naill@ohsu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165725-
dc.description.abstractAlthough function is widely recognized as an important quality-of-life outcome, there is little information about types of activities that are compromised during cancer treatment. The purpose of this analysis was to describe the nature of self-reported functional impairment in patients beginning treatment with chemotherapy or radiation therapy and examine changes in function over the first few weeks of treatment. This study was guided by concepts suggested by self-regulation theory. An instrument that contains 65 detailed activity items, the FPI, was used. The FPI was developed as a measure of function for use with patients with COPD and has demonstrated reliability and validity in COPD (Leidy, 1999). In order to capture the nature of activity changes in cancer patients, 100 subjects participating in an RCT of an energy conservation intervention completed the FPI at the beginning of cancer treatment and several weeks later during treatment. The typical subject was a middle-aged (M = 56.7 years), married (74%), woman (87%) with breast cancer (79%). At the beginning of treatment, 55 subjects ranked body care as the most or second-most important area of function, followed by social interaction (n = 42) and household maintenance (n = 32). As expected, few subjects reported activities as causing much difficulty. Activities requiring large muscle movement and stretching, like carrying groceries, painting, cleaning, or golf presented challenges to a few (&lt;10) subjects. Changes in function over time were examined using paired t-tests computed on FPI subscale scores from baseline to during treatment measures within the control group (n = 54) only as the energy conservation intervention is expected to influence activity in the experimental group. There was a trend (p = .053) for physical activity to decline as treatment progressed. Recreational activity decreased over time (p = .019), but there were no changes in self-reported body care, household maintenance, and social interaction. The findings of these analyses indicate that changes in function are in areas other than personal care ADLs and suggest that measures of function in cancer patients need to encompass recreational and physical activity as well as traditional ADL items. Implications for measuring function, including gender-based items, preference, and attributions will be discussed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:23:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:23:47Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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