The Effects of Symptom Uncertainty on the Emotional and Functional Outcomes of Radiation Therapy for Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165726
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of Symptom Uncertainty on the Emotional and Functional Outcomes of Radiation Therapy for Cancer
Author(s):
Christman, Norma
Author Details:
Norma Christman, University of Kentucky, College of Nursing, Lexington, Kentucky, USA, email: njchri1@pop.uky.edu
Abstract:
Uncertainty about health-related experiences may profoundly influence patient outcomes. Much of what is presently known about illness uncertainty is based on the use of measures developed from cognitive models of information processing and stress and coping with statistically derived subscales. Studying uncertainty about specific aspects of health-related experiences, for example symptoms, might lead to new understandings and more specific intervention strategies. The effects of symptom uncertainty (SU) on emotional and functional outcomes were examined in 76 persons having radiation therapy (RT) for gynecologic, lung, or head/neck cancers. Most had stage II or less disease (63%), were within one month of diagnosis (83%), and were white (92%), female (68%), and married (61%). All were treated with curative intent. SU was measured with 10 items either modified or drawn from Mishel's Uncertainty in Illness Scale. Internal consistency was .67. A non-significant correlation (.15, p > .05) between body awareness and SU supports the scale's discriminate validity; correlations between SU and measures of predictability (-.47, p < .0001) and understanding (-.27, p < .05) support concurrent validity. SU, emotional and functional outcomes, and number of symptoms were measured treatment week three, and two, and four weeks after RT. Outcome indicators were the summed scores from the Profile of Mood States anxiety, depression, and anger subscales, and from linear analog items derived from the Sickness Impact Profile household management and recreation/pastimes scales, plus a linear analog item measuring time spent away from home. A measure of optimism, the Life Orientation Test, also was obtained. The effects of SU on outcomes were examined with hierarchical regression controlling for optimism and number of symptoms. SU explained 15% (p < .001, b = .43), 5% (p < .05, b = .23), and 14% (p < .001, b = .38) of the variance in emotion treatment week three, and two, and four weeks after treatment respectively. Symptom uncertainty contributed to the explanation of functional outcome only two (6%, p < .05, b = -.26) and four (6%, p < .05, b = -.26) weeks following treatment. Incorporating specific information about typical symptom experiences into symptom management strategies may lessen negative effects of SU. Further study about uncertainty due to specific aspects of health-related experiences also is needed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of Symptom Uncertainty on the Emotional and Functional Outcomes of Radiation Therapy for Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorChristman, Normaen_US
dc.author.detailsNorma Christman, University of Kentucky, College of Nursing, Lexington, Kentucky, USA, email: njchri1@pop.uky.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165726-
dc.description.abstractUncertainty about health-related experiences may profoundly influence patient outcomes. Much of what is presently known about illness uncertainty is based on the use of measures developed from cognitive models of information processing and stress and coping with statistically derived subscales. Studying uncertainty about specific aspects of health-related experiences, for example symptoms, might lead to new understandings and more specific intervention strategies. The effects of symptom uncertainty (SU) on emotional and functional outcomes were examined in 76 persons having radiation therapy (RT) for gynecologic, lung, or head/neck cancers. Most had stage II or less disease (63%), were within one month of diagnosis (83%), and were white (92%), female (68%), and married (61%). All were treated with curative intent. SU was measured with 10 items either modified or drawn from Mishel's Uncertainty in Illness Scale. Internal consistency was .67. A non-significant correlation (.15, p &gt; .05) between body awareness and SU supports the scale's discriminate validity; correlations between SU and measures of predictability (-.47, p &lt; .0001) and understanding (-.27, p &lt; .05) support concurrent validity. SU, emotional and functional outcomes, and number of symptoms were measured treatment week three, and two, and four weeks after RT. Outcome indicators were the summed scores from the Profile of Mood States anxiety, depression, and anger subscales, and from linear analog items derived from the Sickness Impact Profile household management and recreation/pastimes scales, plus a linear analog item measuring time spent away from home. A measure of optimism, the Life Orientation Test, also was obtained. The effects of SU on outcomes were examined with hierarchical regression controlling for optimism and number of symptoms. SU explained 15% (p &lt; .001, b = .43), 5% (p &lt; .05, b = .23), and 14% (p &lt; .001, b = .38) of the variance in emotion treatment week three, and two, and four weeks after treatment respectively. Symptom uncertainty contributed to the explanation of functional outcome only two (6%, p &lt; .05, b = -.26) and four (6%, p &lt; .05, b = -.26) weeks following treatment. Incorporating specific information about typical symptom experiences into symptom management strategies may lessen negative effects of SU. Further study about uncertainty due to specific aspects of health-related experiences also is needed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:23:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:23:48Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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