2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165727
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Fatigue and Physical Functioning During Breast Cancer Treatment
Author(s):
Mock, Victoria
Author Details:
Victoria Mock, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Associate Professor, Johns Hopkins University, School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: mockvi@jhmi.edu
Abstract:
Fatigue during cancer treatment often leads to decreases in activity level and subsequent reductions in functional capacity that affect quality of life. Little research has focused on describing these important side effects of cancer treatment. The purpose of this descriptive, correlational study was to determine the relationship between fatigue levels and physical functioning in women receiving adjuvant therapies for breast cancer. The Levine Conservation model served as the study's conceptual framework. In this model, cancer treatment presents challenges that threaten conservation of energy (represented by fatigue) and conservation of structural integrity (represented by physical functioning). The sample included 120 patients recruited from five academic cancer centers as part of a larger study. The women were a mean age of 52 years and were receiving adjuvant chemotherapy (60%) or radiation therapy (40%). Before treatment began and again at the end of treatment, subjects were assessed for fatigue with the Piper Fatigue Scale, for self-reported physical functioning with the MOS-SF 36 Physical Functioning Subscale (PhFx), and for objective changes in functional capacity with the 12-Minute Walk Test. All instruments were valid, reliable, and widely used in cancer research. Data were analyzed using Pearson correlations and descriptive statistics. Results indicate a moderately strong inverse correlation between fatigue levels and self-reported physical functioning (p = -.45, r < .0001). Although physical functioning scores were equivalent at pretest, women with the lowest posttest fatigue levels (lowest quartile) reported a mean PhFx score of 89.6 (possible 0-100) and a mean Walk Test score of 3,385 feet walked in 12 minutes, while women in the highest quartile of posttest fatigue scores (mean of 6.8 on the PFS) reported a mean PhFx score of 66.5, and a mean Walk Test score of 2,941 feet. Findings support the need for additional research as well as for more comprehensive clinical assessment of changes in functional status accompanying unmanaged fatigue during cancer treatment. The significant decrease in physical functioning seen in subjects with high fatigue levels represents a concerning loss of ability to perform daily activities that may not be readily reversible when cancer treatment ends.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFatigue and Physical Functioning During Breast Cancer Treatmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorMock, Victoriaen_US
dc.author.detailsVictoria Mock, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Associate Professor, Johns Hopkins University, School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: mockvi@jhmi.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165727-
dc.description.abstractFatigue during cancer treatment often leads to decreases in activity level and subsequent reductions in functional capacity that affect quality of life. Little research has focused on describing these important side effects of cancer treatment. The purpose of this descriptive, correlational study was to determine the relationship between fatigue levels and physical functioning in women receiving adjuvant therapies for breast cancer. The Levine Conservation model served as the study's conceptual framework. In this model, cancer treatment presents challenges that threaten conservation of energy (represented by fatigue) and conservation of structural integrity (represented by physical functioning). The sample included 120 patients recruited from five academic cancer centers as part of a larger study. The women were a mean age of 52 years and were receiving adjuvant chemotherapy (60%) or radiation therapy (40%). Before treatment began and again at the end of treatment, subjects were assessed for fatigue with the Piper Fatigue Scale, for self-reported physical functioning with the MOS-SF 36 Physical Functioning Subscale (PhFx), and for objective changes in functional capacity with the 12-Minute Walk Test. All instruments were valid, reliable, and widely used in cancer research. Data were analyzed using Pearson correlations and descriptive statistics. Results indicate a moderately strong inverse correlation between fatigue levels and self-reported physical functioning (p = -.45, r &lt; .0001). Although physical functioning scores were equivalent at pretest, women with the lowest posttest fatigue levels (lowest quartile) reported a mean PhFx score of 89.6 (possible 0-100) and a mean Walk Test score of 3,385 feet walked in 12 minutes, while women in the highest quartile of posttest fatigue scores (mean of 6.8 on the PFS) reported a mean PhFx score of 66.5, and a mean Walk Test score of 2,941 feet. Findings support the need for additional research as well as for more comprehensive clinical assessment of changes in functional status accompanying unmanaged fatigue during cancer treatment. The significant decrease in physical functioning seen in subjects with high fatigue levels represents a concerning loss of ability to perform daily activities that may not be readily reversible when cancer treatment ends.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:23:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:23:49Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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