2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165728
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Chronic Sleep Loss in Family Caregivers: Is Depression an Outcome?
Author(s):
Carter, Patricia
Author Details:
Patricia Carter, Assistant Professor, University of Texas-Austin, School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USA, email: pcarter@mail.nur.utexas.edu
Abstract:
Problem: Caregivers may experience levels of depression that can impact their daily functioning, quality of life, and ability to continue in the caregiver role. Depression is a normal response to a family member's diagnosis with cancer; however, other factors amenable to intervention (chronic sleep loss) may severely exacerbate this response. Purpose: This pilot project described caregiver sleep and depression patterns over time and explored the feasibility of data collection methods and instruments. Specific Questions: How do family caregivers' sleep patterns and depression levels change over time? Are the proposed data collection methods and instruments feasible? Framework: Pearlin and colleagues developed a caregiver stress process framework that illustrates the relationships between physical stressors (sleep loss) and emotional outcomes (depression). The questions addressed in this study flow logically from this framework. In order to understand caregiver depression one must first understand the patterns of sleep loss and depression over time. Methods: A descriptive correlational design was used. Ten family caregivers of persons with advanced stage cancer were recruited from cancer clinics in central Texas. Weekly sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index {PSQI}) and depression (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression {CESD}) measurements were obtained by telephone. Caregivers wore an actigraph and recorded daily activities in a log at three separate times (for 72 hours) during the ten-week study. Visual plots of PSQI and CESD scores were generated for each subject. The actigraph data were analyzed using Action W software and sleep latency, duration, and efficiency scores were generated for each subject. Actigraph and PSQI scores were compared. Findings: Visual plots of caregiver sleep and depression scores reveal significant changes over time. Actigraph scores are reflective of self-report (PSQI) of sleep latency, duration, and efficiency. Implications: This pilot provided a visual mapping of caregivers' sleep and depression patterns over time. Understanding sleep and depression patterns is essential to determine the critical time points to administer and measure interventions. This pilot study provided information regarding the feasibility of using the Actigraph in this population as well as the need for weekly measurements of sleep and depression in order to capture changes over time.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChronic Sleep Loss in Family Caregivers: Is Depression an Outcome?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarter, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsPatricia Carter, Assistant Professor, University of Texas-Austin, School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USA, email: pcarter@mail.nur.utexas.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165728-
dc.description.abstractProblem: Caregivers may experience levels of depression that can impact their daily functioning, quality of life, and ability to continue in the caregiver role. Depression is a normal response to a family member's diagnosis with cancer; however, other factors amenable to intervention (chronic sleep loss) may severely exacerbate this response. Purpose: This pilot project described caregiver sleep and depression patterns over time and explored the feasibility of data collection methods and instruments. Specific Questions: How do family caregivers' sleep patterns and depression levels change over time? Are the proposed data collection methods and instruments feasible? Framework: Pearlin and colleagues developed a caregiver stress process framework that illustrates the relationships between physical stressors (sleep loss) and emotional outcomes (depression). The questions addressed in this study flow logically from this framework. In order to understand caregiver depression one must first understand the patterns of sleep loss and depression over time. Methods: A descriptive correlational design was used. Ten family caregivers of persons with advanced stage cancer were recruited from cancer clinics in central Texas. Weekly sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index {PSQI}) and depression (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression {CESD}) measurements were obtained by telephone. Caregivers wore an actigraph and recorded daily activities in a log at three separate times (for 72 hours) during the ten-week study. Visual plots of PSQI and CESD scores were generated for each subject. The actigraph data were analyzed using Action W software and sleep latency, duration, and efficiency scores were generated for each subject. Actigraph and PSQI scores were compared. Findings: Visual plots of caregiver sleep and depression scores reveal significant changes over time. Actigraph scores are reflective of self-report (PSQI) of sleep latency, duration, and efficiency. Implications: This pilot provided a visual mapping of caregivers' sleep and depression patterns over time. Understanding sleep and depression patterns is essential to determine the critical time points to administer and measure interventions. This pilot study provided information regarding the feasibility of using the Actigraph in this population as well as the need for weekly measurements of sleep and depression in order to capture changes over time.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:23:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:23:50Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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