2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165732
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Symptom Management in an Ambulatory Oncology Clinic
Author(s):
Singer, Marybeth
Author Details:
Marybeth Singer, Tufts-New England Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Abstract:
Symptom distress significantly contributes to diminished quality of living for cancer patients and their families. The JCAHO recently mandated that certain minimum standards for assessment/treatment/re-assessment of pain occur throughout the trajectory of illness for patients receiving care within healthcare systems. Patients with cancer frequently experience pain, as well as other symptoms, which can lead to distress. Our urban ambulatory care center implemented a symptom survey for patients to complete at each clinic visit. Goals of the patient symptom survey were: 1) to assess and implement strategies to improve symptom outcomes as a quality improvement initiative, 2) compliance with JCAHO standards for pain management, and 3) provide a vehicle for increased communication between patients and clinicians regarding symptom distress. Symptom survey data collection is continuous. The findings below are reflective of the initial symptom survey pilot over a period of one month. Initial data yielded 136 completed symptom surveys, with 80% of those patients having a hematologic malignancy. The eight most frequent symptoms, listed in order of severity, were lack of energy, negative quality of life, difficulty performing activities of daily living, depression, anxiety, difficulty with concentration, pain, and coping distress. When symptoms are evaluated based on diagnosis, the rank ordering and severity are similar regardless of cancer diagnosis. Symptom intensity greater than 7 (0-10 scale) occurred in 35% of patients, 66% of whom had 1-3 concurrent symptoms with an intensity greater than seven. The most compelling information was gleaned at the time of follow-up telephone interviews with those patients with symptom intensity greater than seven. Only 29% of patients had discussed the symptoms with their MD or NP at the time of their visit. When discussion occurred with the clinician, 100% of patients felt that steps were taken to address their symptom distress. When discussion did not occur specific to symptom survey, 83% of patients felt no steps were taken to address their symptom distress. More than 50% of ambulatory oncology patients in our pilot survey reported symptom distress related to their disease and treatment. Data collection is on-going as part of a continuous quality improvement initiative to ensure optimal symptom management for patients. Comprehensive cancer care means attending to all symptoms associated with patient distress and allocating resources to meet those needs.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving Symptom Management in an Ambulatory Oncology Clinicen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSinger, Marybethen_US
dc.author.detailsMarybeth Singer, Tufts-New England Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165732-
dc.description.abstractSymptom distress significantly contributes to diminished quality of living for cancer patients and their families. The JCAHO recently mandated that certain minimum standards for assessment/treatment/re-assessment of pain occur throughout the trajectory of illness for patients receiving care within healthcare systems. Patients with cancer frequently experience pain, as well as other symptoms, which can lead to distress. Our urban ambulatory care center implemented a symptom survey for patients to complete at each clinic visit. Goals of the patient symptom survey were: 1) to assess and implement strategies to improve symptom outcomes as a quality improvement initiative, 2) compliance with JCAHO standards for pain management, and 3) provide a vehicle for increased communication between patients and clinicians regarding symptom distress. Symptom survey data collection is continuous. The findings below are reflective of the initial symptom survey pilot over a period of one month. Initial data yielded 136 completed symptom surveys, with 80% of those patients having a hematologic malignancy. The eight most frequent symptoms, listed in order of severity, were lack of energy, negative quality of life, difficulty performing activities of daily living, depression, anxiety, difficulty with concentration, pain, and coping distress. When symptoms are evaluated based on diagnosis, the rank ordering and severity are similar regardless of cancer diagnosis. Symptom intensity greater than 7 (0-10 scale) occurred in 35% of patients, 66% of whom had 1-3 concurrent symptoms with an intensity greater than seven. The most compelling information was gleaned at the time of follow-up telephone interviews with those patients with symptom intensity greater than seven. Only 29% of patients had discussed the symptoms with their MD or NP at the time of their visit. When discussion occurred with the clinician, 100% of patients felt that steps were taken to address their symptom distress. When discussion did not occur specific to symptom survey, 83% of patients felt no steps were taken to address their symptom distress. More than 50% of ambulatory oncology patients in our pilot survey reported symptom distress related to their disease and treatment. Data collection is on-going as part of a continuous quality improvement initiative to ensure optimal symptom management for patients. Comprehensive cancer care means attending to all symptoms associated with patient distress and allocating resources to meet those needs.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:23:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:23:55Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.