The Prevalence of Symptoms Clusters and Comorbidities in Oncology Outpatients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165735
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Prevalence of Symptoms Clusters and Comorbidities in Oncology Outpatients
Author(s):
Dodd, Marylin
Author Details:
Marylin Dodd, PhD, Professor, University of California-San Francisco, School of Nursing, San Francisco, California, USA, email: marylin.dodd@nursing.ucsf.edu
Abstract:
The prevalence of a number of symptoms including pain, fatigue, nausea and vomiting, depression, and sleep disturbance has been investigated in oncology outpatients. The traditional approach used in these investigations was to perform detailed assessments of individual symptoms. However, clinical experience suggests that oncology outpatients present with multiple symptoms and a variety of comorbid conditions. Therefore, the purposes of this cross-sectional study, in a sample of oncology outpatients, were: 1) to determine the prevalence of pain, fatigue, and/or sleep disturbances, and 2) to determine the prevalence of a number of comorbid conditions. The UCSF Symptom Management Model served as the conceptual framework for this study. One hundred oncology outpatients were recruited from three outpatient settings. Patients were over 18 years of age and were receiving active treatment for their disease. Patients were asked to complete the Wisconsin Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), the Lee Fatigue Scale (LFS), the General Sleep Disturbance Scale (GSDS), and a checklist of common medical conditions. Patients were categorized into one of eight symptom clusters using the following cutoffs: a worst pain score of greater than three, an LFS score of greater than five, and a GSDS score of greater than 60. Descriptive statistics and frequency distributions were generated. The average patient was 59.4 years of age, female (76.8%), and had a Karnofsky score of 77.2. The prevalence of the eight symptom groupings were as follows: no symptoms, 42.3%; only pain, 10.3%; only fatigue, 6.2%; only sleep disturbance, 8.2%; pain & fatigue, 4.1%, pain & sleep disturbance, 9.3%; fatigue & sleep disturbance, 6.2%; and pain, fatigue, & sleep disturbance, 13.4%. The most frequently reported comorbid conditions by these patients were back problems, 65.2%; allergies, 58.5%; headaches, 50.5%; hemorrhoids, 46.3%; arthritis, 33.3%; and hypertension, 30.4%. These findings suggest that oncology outpatients do experience multiple symptoms simultaneously and are living with a number of comorbid conditions in addition to their cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Prevalence of Symptoms Clusters and Comorbidities in Oncology Outpatientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDodd, Marylinen_US
dc.author.detailsMarylin Dodd, PhD, Professor, University of California-San Francisco, School of Nursing, San Francisco, California, USA, email: marylin.dodd@nursing.ucsf.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165735-
dc.description.abstractThe prevalence of a number of symptoms including pain, fatigue, nausea and vomiting, depression, and sleep disturbance has been investigated in oncology outpatients. The traditional approach used in these investigations was to perform detailed assessments of individual symptoms. However, clinical experience suggests that oncology outpatients present with multiple symptoms and a variety of comorbid conditions. Therefore, the purposes of this cross-sectional study, in a sample of oncology outpatients, were: 1) to determine the prevalence of pain, fatigue, and/or sleep disturbances, and 2) to determine the prevalence of a number of comorbid conditions. The UCSF Symptom Management Model served as the conceptual framework for this study. One hundred oncology outpatients were recruited from three outpatient settings. Patients were over 18 years of age and were receiving active treatment for their disease. Patients were asked to complete the Wisconsin Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), the Lee Fatigue Scale (LFS), the General Sleep Disturbance Scale (GSDS), and a checklist of common medical conditions. Patients were categorized into one of eight symptom clusters using the following cutoffs: a worst pain score of greater than three, an LFS score of greater than five, and a GSDS score of greater than 60. Descriptive statistics and frequency distributions were generated. The average patient was 59.4 years of age, female (76.8%), and had a Karnofsky score of 77.2. The prevalence of the eight symptom groupings were as follows: no symptoms, 42.3%; only pain, 10.3%; only fatigue, 6.2%; only sleep disturbance, 8.2%; pain & fatigue, 4.1%, pain & sleep disturbance, 9.3%; fatigue & sleep disturbance, 6.2%; and pain, fatigue, & sleep disturbance, 13.4%. The most frequently reported comorbid conditions by these patients were back problems, 65.2%; allergies, 58.5%; headaches, 50.5%; hemorrhoids, 46.3%; arthritis, 33.3%; and hypertension, 30.4%. These findings suggest that oncology outpatients do experience multiple symptoms simultaneously and are living with a number of comorbid conditions in addition to their cancer.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:23:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:23:58Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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