Information and Decision Preferences of Men With Prostate Cancer and Their Partners

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165736
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Information and Decision Preferences of Men With Prostate Cancer and Their Partners
Author(s):
Davison, B.
Author Details:
B. Davison, Vancouver General Hospital, The Prostate Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, email: jdavison@vanhosp.bc.ca
Abstract:
Previous research has shown the majority of men newly diagnosed with prostate cancer do want to be involved in medical decision making, and they want to be informed. However, the information of preferences of partners and the extent to which they want to be involved in treatment decision making has not previously been studied. The purpose of this study was to identify and compare information and decision preferences of men with prostate cancer and their partners at the time of diagnosis. A convenience sample of 80 couples was recruited from the Prostate Centre in Vancouver, Canada. Participants used a touch screen computer program consisting of two previously used measures with this population: 1) Control Preferences Scale, used to elicit patient preferences for control over medical decision making (based on Unfolding Theory), and 2) Information Survey Questionnaire (based on Thurstone methodology). Results showed the vast majority of men wanted to participate in decision making with their physician (92.5%), and partners (100%). The majority (55%) of partners wanted to play a collaborative role in treatment decision making. Couples identified prognosis, stage of disease, treatment options, and side effects as their top four information preferences. Men ranked information on sexuality more important than partners (P = .004), and partners ranked information on home self care higher than men (P = .01). Men who had sons, a positive family history, and lower levels of education ranked heredity risk significantly higher (P = .001). Profiles of information categories did not differ according to role preferences of either men or partners. The computer program has been shown to be a reliable and acceptable method of assessing the information and decision preferences of these couples. Group profiles demonstrated low to moderate agreement, but individual profiles were shown to be highly reliable. Findings support the need for using an individualized approach to the provision of information to these individuals at the time of diagnosis. Print outs from this computer program can be used to guide information counseling sessions in a variety of outpatient oncology settings.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInformation and Decision Preferences of Men With Prostate Cancer and Their Partnersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDavison, B.en_US
dc.author.detailsB. Davison, Vancouver General Hospital, The Prostate Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, email: jdavison@vanhosp.bc.caen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165736-
dc.description.abstractPrevious research has shown the majority of men newly diagnosed with prostate cancer do want to be involved in medical decision making, and they want to be informed. However, the information of preferences of partners and the extent to which they want to be involved in treatment decision making has not previously been studied. The purpose of this study was to identify and compare information and decision preferences of men with prostate cancer and their partners at the time of diagnosis. A convenience sample of 80 couples was recruited from the Prostate Centre in Vancouver, Canada. Participants used a touch screen computer program consisting of two previously used measures with this population: 1) Control Preferences Scale, used to elicit patient preferences for control over medical decision making (based on Unfolding Theory), and 2) Information Survey Questionnaire (based on Thurstone methodology). Results showed the vast majority of men wanted to participate in decision making with their physician (92.5%), and partners (100%). The majority (55%) of partners wanted to play a collaborative role in treatment decision making. Couples identified prognosis, stage of disease, treatment options, and side effects as their top four information preferences. Men ranked information on sexuality more important than partners (P = .004), and partners ranked information on home self care higher than men (P = .01). Men who had sons, a positive family history, and lower levels of education ranked heredity risk significantly higher (P = .001). Profiles of information categories did not differ according to role preferences of either men or partners. The computer program has been shown to be a reliable and acceptable method of assessing the information and decision preferences of these couples. Group profiles demonstrated low to moderate agreement, but individual profiles were shown to be highly reliable. Findings support the need for using an individualized approach to the provision of information to these individuals at the time of diagnosis. Print outs from this computer program can be used to guide information counseling sessions in a variety of outpatient oncology settings.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:23:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:23:59Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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