2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165738
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Tobacco Cessation Counseling Program for Hospitalized Patients
Author(s):
Kjellberg, Janice
Author Details:
Janice Kjellberg, Park Nicollet Institute, Minneapolis, Minneapolis, USA
Abstract:
A hospital stay is an opportune time for tobacco cessation intervention because tobacco bans force abstinence, patients are removed from their usual triggers for tobacco use, patients are more focused on health concerns, and there is access to knowledgeable care providers. The tobacco cessation counseling program at this Midwest urban community hospital was developed out of a NIH-funded study that compared interventions to help hospitalized patients quit smoking. The study found that patients receiving counseling and follow-up had a 10% higher quit rate than those receiving less intensive interventions. The main goal of the current program is to help hospitalized patients quit tobacco, and to abstain from tobacco use after discharge. Eligibility criteria includes use of tobacco within the past three months; age greater than 17 years; not admitted for mental health, substance abuse, or eating disorder; and not too ill or impaired to participate. Intervention is given by a trained tobacco counselor who establishes eligibility, determines patient readiness to quit, and provides bedside counseling and appropriate tobacco cessation literature. The intervention is documented in patient charts and pharmacotherapy is recommended to the physician when appropriate. Tobacco users who are ready to quit are also offered three to six follow-up phone calls to promote abstinence after discharge. Program evaluation is done with a mailed survey or by phone if the participant does not respond. The survey assesses six-month quit rates, patient satisfaction with the program, level of program participation, and use of pharmacotherapy or other cessation aids. Over 20 months, 1,263 patients received in-hospital counseling, and 698 patients agreed to a six-month follow-up. Of the 244 for whom follow-up data is available, the quit rate is 105/244 (43%). From this group, 73 (30%) have not used tobacco since hospitalization and an additional 32 (13%) have been abstinent for the past seven days. Of the respondents, 78% found in-hospital counseling helpful, and 71% found phone follow-up helpful. Thirty percent of participants used the nicotine patch and 24% used Zyban. The results support the efficacy of this tobacco cessation counseling program in the hospital setting.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Tobacco Cessation Counseling Program for Hospitalized Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKjellberg, Janiceen_US
dc.author.detailsJanice Kjellberg, Park Nicollet Institute, Minneapolis, Minneapolis, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165738-
dc.description.abstractA hospital stay is an opportune time for tobacco cessation intervention because tobacco bans force abstinence, patients are removed from their usual triggers for tobacco use, patients are more focused on health concerns, and there is access to knowledgeable care providers. The tobacco cessation counseling program at this Midwest urban community hospital was developed out of a NIH-funded study that compared interventions to help hospitalized patients quit smoking. The study found that patients receiving counseling and follow-up had a 10% higher quit rate than those receiving less intensive interventions. The main goal of the current program is to help hospitalized patients quit tobacco, and to abstain from tobacco use after discharge. Eligibility criteria includes use of tobacco within the past three months; age greater than 17 years; not admitted for mental health, substance abuse, or eating disorder; and not too ill or impaired to participate. Intervention is given by a trained tobacco counselor who establishes eligibility, determines patient readiness to quit, and provides bedside counseling and appropriate tobacco cessation literature. The intervention is documented in patient charts and pharmacotherapy is recommended to the physician when appropriate. Tobacco users who are ready to quit are also offered three to six follow-up phone calls to promote abstinence after discharge. Program evaluation is done with a mailed survey or by phone if the participant does not respond. The survey assesses six-month quit rates, patient satisfaction with the program, level of program participation, and use of pharmacotherapy or other cessation aids. Over 20 months, 1,263 patients received in-hospital counseling, and 698 patients agreed to a six-month follow-up. Of the 244 for whom follow-up data is available, the quit rate is 105/244 (43%). From this group, 73 (30%) have not used tobacco since hospitalization and an additional 32 (13%) have been abstinent for the past seven days. Of the respondents, 78% found in-hospital counseling helpful, and 71% found phone follow-up helpful. Thirty percent of participants used the nicotine patch and 24% used Zyban. The results support the efficacy of this tobacco cessation counseling program in the hospital setting.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:24:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:24:01Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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