Making the Choice: How Women at Risk for Breast Cancer Feel About Prophylactic Mastectomy to Reduce Breast Cancer Risk if They Were to Have a Positive BRCA Genetic Test

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165739
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Making the Choice: How Women at Risk for Breast Cancer Feel About Prophylactic Mastectomy to Reduce Breast Cancer Risk if They Were to Have a Positive BRCA Genetic Test
Author(s):
Greco, Karen
Author Details:
Karen Greco, Oregon Health & Science University, School of Nursing, Portland, Oregon, USA
Abstract:
Purpose/Objectives: This study is a secondary analysis of some qualitative data from the study, "Family Disclosure of Cancer Risk: An Ethnographic Study." The study purpose is to better understand how women at risk for breast cancer feel about prophylactic mastectomy as an option to reduce breast cancer risk if they were to have a positive BRCA genetic test. Sample: Data are from interviews with 246 women aged 40 to 60, of varying ethnicity, family history of breast cancer (negative, positive, borderline), and educational level. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: This secondary analysis used grounded theory. The original study is a quantitative and descriptive ethnographic study. Design: Data were collected in the original study using semi-structured interviews to assess women's attitudes toward and hypothetical interest in genetic susceptibility testing for breast cancer. Methods: Data from four questions in the original interviews were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Data Analysis: Open coding was done to identify concepts. Data were analyzed independently by three researchers; myself, the PI, and the co-investigator. Themes were identified and diagramed. Discussion of data analysis among the three researchers occurred throughout the process. Findings: Women's responses represented a continuum from "it is a mutilation" to "yes, it wouldn't bother me at all." The primary theme identified was "making the choice." Women made a clear distinction between agreeing to have a predisposition genetic test for BRCA and agreeing to have prophylactic mastectomies should the test result be positive. Many women said they would obtain second opinions and would mistrust their provider for suggesting such radical surgery. Four subthemes were identified: search for alternatives, inadequate provider, let the cancer come, and keeping my parts. Conclusions: Most women responded that they would likely agree to have a predisposition genetic test for BRCA if it were recommended by their physician. However, they would not automatically agree to prophylactic mastectomies even if that were the best treatment available to reduce breast cancer risk. Implications for Research/Practice: Oncology nurses need to understand that although prophylactic mastectomies may be effective in reducing breast cancer risk, women may have strong responses to the suggestion.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaking the Choice: How Women at Risk for Breast Cancer Feel About Prophylactic Mastectomy to Reduce Breast Cancer Risk if They Were to Have a Positive BRCA Genetic Testen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGreco, Karenen_US
dc.author.detailsKaren Greco, Oregon Health & Science University, School of Nursing, Portland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165739-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Objectives: This study is a secondary analysis of some qualitative data from the study, "Family Disclosure of Cancer Risk: An Ethnographic Study." The study purpose is to better understand how women at risk for breast cancer feel about prophylactic mastectomy as an option to reduce breast cancer risk if they were to have a positive BRCA genetic test. Sample: Data are from interviews with 246 women aged 40 to 60, of varying ethnicity, family history of breast cancer (negative, positive, borderline), and educational level. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: This secondary analysis used grounded theory. The original study is a quantitative and descriptive ethnographic study. Design: Data were collected in the original study using semi-structured interviews to assess women's attitudes toward and hypothetical interest in genetic susceptibility testing for breast cancer. Methods: Data from four questions in the original interviews were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Data Analysis: Open coding was done to identify concepts. Data were analyzed independently by three researchers; myself, the PI, and the co-investigator. Themes were identified and diagramed. Discussion of data analysis among the three researchers occurred throughout the process. Findings: Women's responses represented a continuum from "it is a mutilation" to "yes, it wouldn't bother me at all." The primary theme identified was "making the choice." Women made a clear distinction between agreeing to have a predisposition genetic test for BRCA and agreeing to have prophylactic mastectomies should the test result be positive. Many women said they would obtain second opinions and would mistrust their provider for suggesting such radical surgery. Four subthemes were identified: search for alternatives, inadequate provider, let the cancer come, and keeping my parts. Conclusions: Most women responded that they would likely agree to have a predisposition genetic test for BRCA if it were recommended by their physician. However, they would not automatically agree to prophylactic mastectomies even if that were the best treatment available to reduce breast cancer risk. Implications for Research/Practice: Oncology nurses need to understand that although prophylactic mastectomies may be effective in reducing breast cancer risk, women may have strong responses to the suggestion.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:24:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:24:02Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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