Prechemotherapy Self-Care Management Instruction in Older Male Veterans With a Cancer Diagnosis: An Experimental Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165740
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Prechemotherapy Self-Care Management Instruction in Older Male Veterans With a Cancer Diagnosis: An Experimental Study
Author(s):
Sicola, Virginia
Author Details:
Virginia Sicola, PhD, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Amarillo VA Health Care System, Amarillo, Texas, USA, email: asicola@amaonline.com
Abstract:
Instruction in self-care management before chemotherapy is provided to older adult males without knowing if it is beneficial. Therefore, the purpose of this prospective, randomized, control study was to examine the benefit of prechemotherapy self-care management instruction on post-treatment mental status, physical performance, and frequency of side effects in older male veterans diagnosed with cancer. The theoretical framework used Orem's self-care as the process adults use to regulate their own functioning. A cancer patient experiences limitations and side effects of treatment, thus experiences a self-care deficit. The nurses' role is to reduce the deficit. The sample included 67 veterans with cancer receiving at least two cycles of chemotherapy. No subjects younger than 55 years of age, with a previous cancer history, alcoholism, drug dependency, or mental deficiency were included. Each veteran was given the valid and reliable Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Karnofsky Performance Status Scale (KPS) score by the research assistant (RA). Then, the veteran was randomly assigned to the control or experimental group by the researcher who gave both groups a 15-minute introduction to chemotherapy and its side effects. The experimental group received further instructions in self-care management. Prior to the second treatment, the RA retested the patients. Each subject reported the number of medically-treated side effects. With 35 control and 32 experimental subjects, the data were analyzed using t tests and means. Results showed that following treatment, the KPS approached significance (p value = 0.110) with the experimental group's mean score dropping 2.8 points compared to the control group's score dropping 5.8. Side effects significantly lower for the experimental group included constipation (p value = 0.009) and dizziness (p value = 0.05). At the 0.15 level of significance, the experimental group experienced less nausea, vomiting, and sleep difficulties. The findings indicate that self-care management provided prior to chemotherapy improves physical performance and reduced some side effects in older veterans. Further research calls to extend this study by evaluating older patients beyond the second cycle. In practice, instruction in self-care before chemotherapy is of benefit for older men.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePrechemotherapy Self-Care Management Instruction in Older Male Veterans With a Cancer Diagnosis: An Experimental Studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSicola, Virginiaen_US
dc.author.detailsVirginia Sicola, PhD, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Amarillo VA Health Care System, Amarillo, Texas, USA, email: asicola@amaonline.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165740-
dc.description.abstractInstruction in self-care management before chemotherapy is provided to older adult males without knowing if it is beneficial. Therefore, the purpose of this prospective, randomized, control study was to examine the benefit of prechemotherapy self-care management instruction on post-treatment mental status, physical performance, and frequency of side effects in older male veterans diagnosed with cancer. The theoretical framework used Orem's self-care as the process adults use to regulate their own functioning. A cancer patient experiences limitations and side effects of treatment, thus experiences a self-care deficit. The nurses' role is to reduce the deficit. The sample included 67 veterans with cancer receiving at least two cycles of chemotherapy. No subjects younger than 55 years of age, with a previous cancer history, alcoholism, drug dependency, or mental deficiency were included. Each veteran was given the valid and reliable Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Karnofsky Performance Status Scale (KPS) score by the research assistant (RA). Then, the veteran was randomly assigned to the control or experimental group by the researcher who gave both groups a 15-minute introduction to chemotherapy and its side effects. The experimental group received further instructions in self-care management. Prior to the second treatment, the RA retested the patients. Each subject reported the number of medically-treated side effects. With 35 control and 32 experimental subjects, the data were analyzed using t tests and means. Results showed that following treatment, the KPS approached significance (p value = 0.110) with the experimental group's mean score dropping 2.8 points compared to the control group's score dropping 5.8. Side effects significantly lower for the experimental group included constipation (p value = 0.009) and dizziness (p value = 0.05). At the 0.15 level of significance, the experimental group experienced less nausea, vomiting, and sleep difficulties. The findings indicate that self-care management provided prior to chemotherapy improves physical performance and reduced some side effects in older veterans. Further research calls to extend this study by evaluating older patients beyond the second cycle. In practice, instruction in self-care before chemotherapy is of benefit for older men.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:24:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:24:03Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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