Nurse Internship for a Blood and Marrow Transplant Unit: An Approach to Recruitment and Retention

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165741
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurse Internship for a Blood and Marrow Transplant Unit: An Approach to Recruitment and Retention
Author(s):
Mishaw, Katherine
Author Details:
Katherine Mishaw, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA
Abstract:
Today's nursing shortage is evidenced by fewer nurses entering the workforce, acute nursing shortages in certain geographic areas, and a shortage of nurses prepared to meet specialty patient needs in a changing healthcare environment. This is clearly evident in the blood and marrow transplant unit at MDACC, which processes approximately 600 transplants per year. It is a challenge to recruit nurses with cancer experience, much less, with a background in this specialty. Although nurses like the challenging environment, including the latest treatment and technology, many verbalize that the unit is too daunting in terms of the learning curve. Applicants are concerned whether the institution is committed to training for the nurses. In response to this concern, this BMT unit refined its current curriculum to include a three-month "internship program." The program includes the hospital orientation, the BMT unit orientation, and additional clinical experiences to provide the "big picture" of the transplant process. These experiences include the ambulatory BMT clinics (observe both the pretransplant workup and the immediate post hospitalization needs for both the allogeneic and autologous transplant patients), pheresis unit (observing photopheresis, stem cell, single donor platelet, and donor lymphocyte collections), and observation in the chronic GVHD clinic. Tools developed for the internship program include an orientation pathway, BMT course curriculum (includes ONS SIG recommendations and additional hematology/oncology), an orientee study guide, and patient case studies/vignettes. These vignettes are reviewed in weekly post-clinical seminars to enhance critical thinking, assessment, data collection, priority setting, and decision-making skills in these novice nurses. This program empowers the nurse with the knowledge to provide competent care for this patient population and may serve as a model for orientation of the advanced practice nurses for BMT as well as future "residency" programs for nurses in BMT arena. This presentation will detail this program, the tools utilized, cost analysis, and the outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurse Internship for a Blood and Marrow Transplant Unit: An Approach to Recruitment and Retentionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMishaw, Katherineen_US
dc.author.detailsKatherine Mishaw, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165741-
dc.description.abstractToday's nursing shortage is evidenced by fewer nurses entering the workforce, acute nursing shortages in certain geographic areas, and a shortage of nurses prepared to meet specialty patient needs in a changing healthcare environment. This is clearly evident in the blood and marrow transplant unit at MDACC, which processes approximately 600 transplants per year. It is a challenge to recruit nurses with cancer experience, much less, with a background in this specialty. Although nurses like the challenging environment, including the latest treatment and technology, many verbalize that the unit is too daunting in terms of the learning curve. Applicants are concerned whether the institution is committed to training for the nurses. In response to this concern, this BMT unit refined its current curriculum to include a three-month "internship program." The program includes the hospital orientation, the BMT unit orientation, and additional clinical experiences to provide the "big picture" of the transplant process. These experiences include the ambulatory BMT clinics (observe both the pretransplant workup and the immediate post hospitalization needs for both the allogeneic and autologous transplant patients), pheresis unit (observing photopheresis, stem cell, single donor platelet, and donor lymphocyte collections), and observation in the chronic GVHD clinic. Tools developed for the internship program include an orientation pathway, BMT course curriculum (includes ONS SIG recommendations and additional hematology/oncology), an orientee study guide, and patient case studies/vignettes. These vignettes are reviewed in weekly post-clinical seminars to enhance critical thinking, assessment, data collection, priority setting, and decision-making skills in these novice nurses. This program empowers the nurse with the knowledge to provide competent care for this patient population and may serve as a model for orientation of the advanced practice nurses for BMT as well as future "residency" programs for nurses in BMT arena. This presentation will detail this program, the tools utilized, cost analysis, and the outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:24:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:24:04Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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