Clinical Skills, Critical Thinking, and Communication: Using a Learning Contract to Develop the New Oncology Nurse

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165743
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Clinical Skills, Critical Thinking, and Communication: Using a Learning Contract to Develop the New Oncology Nurse
Author(s):
Cowan, Ellen
Author Details:
Ellen Cowan, Clinical Nurse Educator, Duke University Health Systems, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: cowan007@mc.duke.edu
Abstract:
A nurse internship is one strategy to retain and develop new nurses. New nurses may be attracted to an internship because of the additional structure, support, time, and opportunities offered during the first years of practice. Knowing that nursing students receive little specialty education in oncology, institutions develop internships to be competitive during a nursing shortage. However, the intern looking for clinical experience may become dissatisfied when personal goals do not match institutional expectations. For an institution, additional resources and financial bonuses may attract staff, but there is no legal guarantee that the intern will remain employed long enough for the institution to recoup their investment. These issues were identified as major factors in the success of an oncology internship program. To address these concerns at Duke University Medical Center (DUMC), a learning contract was developed to clarify goals and expectations for the intern and the institution. The goals for the first six months of practice focused on demonstrating basic nursing competency as an RN within the DUMC system for the oncology unit population. During the second six months of practice, goals focused on developing the specialized knowledge required to manage the oncology patient and to provide educational rotations to sites across the oncology continuum of care. Goals for the second clinical year of the internship involved professional development and oncology nursing certification. Del Bueno's model of performance-based development was used in writing measurable objectives for three areas, clinical skills, critical thinking skills, and interpersonal skills to direct the learning activities needed to demonstrate professional practice as an oncology nurse. The contract included intern responsibilities, mentor resources, and target dates for completing objectives. By tailoring the experience to the needs of the adult learner, increased commitment demonstrated by retention and attainment of professional perspectives will be evidenced and are being evaluated as outcomes of the program. The intern also is evaluated based on the objectives identified for each of the time frames within the two-year period. This presentation will describe the evaluation and implications of using a learning contract to enhance commitment to an oncology nurse internship.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleClinical Skills, Critical Thinking, and Communication: Using a Learning Contract to Develop the New Oncology Nurseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCowan, Ellenen_US
dc.author.detailsEllen Cowan, Clinical Nurse Educator, Duke University Health Systems, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: cowan007@mc.duke.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165743-
dc.description.abstractA nurse internship is one strategy to retain and develop new nurses. New nurses may be attracted to an internship because of the additional structure, support, time, and opportunities offered during the first years of practice. Knowing that nursing students receive little specialty education in oncology, institutions develop internships to be competitive during a nursing shortage. However, the intern looking for clinical experience may become dissatisfied when personal goals do not match institutional expectations. For an institution, additional resources and financial bonuses may attract staff, but there is no legal guarantee that the intern will remain employed long enough for the institution to recoup their investment. These issues were identified as major factors in the success of an oncology internship program. To address these concerns at Duke University Medical Center (DUMC), a learning contract was developed to clarify goals and expectations for the intern and the institution. The goals for the first six months of practice focused on demonstrating basic nursing competency as an RN within the DUMC system for the oncology unit population. During the second six months of practice, goals focused on developing the specialized knowledge required to manage the oncology patient and to provide educational rotations to sites across the oncology continuum of care. Goals for the second clinical year of the internship involved professional development and oncology nursing certification. Del Bueno's model of performance-based development was used in writing measurable objectives for three areas, clinical skills, critical thinking skills, and interpersonal skills to direct the learning activities needed to demonstrate professional practice as an oncology nurse. The contract included intern responsibilities, mentor resources, and target dates for completing objectives. By tailoring the experience to the needs of the adult learner, increased commitment demonstrated by retention and attainment of professional perspectives will be evidenced and are being evaluated as outcomes of the program. The intern also is evaluated based on the objectives identified for each of the time frames within the two-year period. This presentation will describe the evaluation and implications of using a learning contract to enhance commitment to an oncology nurse internship.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:24:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:24:06Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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