2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165745
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mylotarg(tm)-The New Antibody Targeted Chemotherapy
Author(s):
Prokop, Betty
Author Details:
Betty Prokop, Duke Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
Abstract:
Due to the incidence of relapsed AML, researchers continue to look for innovative treatments that provide patients with a durable remission. One of the newest advances in the treatment of AML is an antibody-targeted chemotherapy known as, Mylotarg. Mylotarg combines specific targeting of an antibody with the antitumor activity of a highly potent chemotherapeutic agent that affects the CD 33 antigen. Mylotarg is indicated for patients with CD 33+ AML in first relapse who are 60+ years of age and who are not candidates for other cytoxic therapies. With advances in treatment, oncology nurses face the challenge of caring for this predominantly elderly population that often has other co-morbid diseases. The vast array of side effects/complications includes severe thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, anemia, bleeding, and infections including sepsis and pneumonia. Adverse events include fever, chills, nausea, emesis, asthenia, diarrhea, abdominal pain, headache, stomatitis, dyspnea, epistaxis, hypokalemia, anorexia, constipation, local reaction, and non-specific rash. Due to the possibility of this population having a complicated medical history, oncology nurses attempt to minimize the treatment related side effects and enhance patient satisfaction through patient education and early recognition of symptoms. Patient/family teaching should include specific side effects, signs & symptoms of toxicity, standard precautions, and self-care needs. The education of oncology nurses is imperative with the administration of Mylotarg. In order for nurses to implement excellent care, early identification and management of these complications is vital to the positive outcome and survival of this population. There are various avenues available for nurses to receive the required education needed for patient care. Handouts, audio-visual tapes, and pharmaceutical-sponsored in-services are a few methods being utilized. Unit-based testing can also be performed. This poster abstract will provide educational tools for nurses that will enable them to provide better care for patients with relapsed AML.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMylotarg(tm)-The New Antibody Targeted Chemotherapyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorProkop, Bettyen_US
dc.author.detailsBetty Prokop, Duke Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165745-
dc.description.abstractDue to the incidence of relapsed AML, researchers continue to look for innovative treatments that provide patients with a durable remission. One of the newest advances in the treatment of AML is an antibody-targeted chemotherapy known as, Mylotarg. Mylotarg combines specific targeting of an antibody with the antitumor activity of a highly potent chemotherapeutic agent that affects the CD 33 antigen. Mylotarg is indicated for patients with CD 33+ AML in first relapse who are 60+ years of age and who are not candidates for other cytoxic therapies. With advances in treatment, oncology nurses face the challenge of caring for this predominantly elderly population that often has other co-morbid diseases. The vast array of side effects/complications includes severe thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, anemia, bleeding, and infections including sepsis and pneumonia. Adverse events include fever, chills, nausea, emesis, asthenia, diarrhea, abdominal pain, headache, stomatitis, dyspnea, epistaxis, hypokalemia, anorexia, constipation, local reaction, and non-specific rash. Due to the possibility of this population having a complicated medical history, oncology nurses attempt to minimize the treatment related side effects and enhance patient satisfaction through patient education and early recognition of symptoms. Patient/family teaching should include specific side effects, signs & symptoms of toxicity, standard precautions, and self-care needs. The education of oncology nurses is imperative with the administration of Mylotarg. In order for nurses to implement excellent care, early identification and management of these complications is vital to the positive outcome and survival of this population. There are various avenues available for nurses to receive the required education needed for patient care. Handouts, audio-visual tapes, and pharmaceutical-sponsored in-services are a few methods being utilized. Unit-based testing can also be performed. This poster abstract will provide educational tools for nurses that will enable them to provide better care for patients with relapsed AML.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:24:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:24:08Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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