2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165749
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Achieving Strength in Cancer Survivorship: Lessons From Published Memoirs
Author(s):
Gallia, Katherine
Author Details:
Katherine Gallia, Associate Professor, University of the Incarnate Word, School of Nursing and Health Professions, San Antonio, Texas, USA
Abstract:
Much of the research on cancer survival has been conducted with an aggregate focus, emphasizing time course, pathological changes, and a schema of an orderly progression of events from the perspective of traditional biomedicine. Little attention has been given to how persons diagnosed with cancer find strength within their personal frames of reference to travel the path of survivorship successfully. Published memoirs of cancer survivors are an untapped resource of rich data about the experience of survivorship from the personal perspective. They offer researchers the opportunity to gain understanding, within a narrative context, of how survivors use cognitive processes to make meaning of events and circumstances and to summon resources for a successful outcome. The purpose of this study was to elucidate cognitive processes by which cancer survivors manage the trajectory of survival, from diagnosis onward, as represented in published memoirs. Five book-length memoirs written in the first person, published within the past eight years, describing cancer trajectories beginning no more than 16 years ago, representing a variety of cancer diagnoses, and containing dense descriptions of illness-related events and subjective experiences were chosen for analysis. Memoirs of health professionals and those written with a co-author were excluded from the study. Data was analyzed with a combination of grounded theory and narrative analysis methods. Constant comparative analysis was used to code and cluster data from each memoir and to compare and synthesize data across the memoirs. A core narrative was constructed for each memoir to preserve its temporal structure as a point of reference during analysis. Nonlinear paths of survival which emerged from these memoirs were supported by five common cognitive processes: framing meaning within the context of the past and future, filtering choices about treatment and ways of coping through a personal explanatory framework, withdrawing strategically to protect the self, valuing gifts discovered in adversity, and choosing a new life. Ways for oncology nurses to respect individual paths to cancer survivorship are discussed. The use of study findings in planning for a cross-cultural naturalistic study of cognitive processes among cancer survivors is described.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAchieving Strength in Cancer Survivorship: Lessons From Published Memoirsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGallia, Katherineen_US
dc.author.detailsKatherine Gallia, Associate Professor, University of the Incarnate Word, School of Nursing and Health Professions, San Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165749-
dc.description.abstractMuch of the research on cancer survival has been conducted with an aggregate focus, emphasizing time course, pathological changes, and a schema of an orderly progression of events from the perspective of traditional biomedicine. Little attention has been given to how persons diagnosed with cancer find strength within their personal frames of reference to travel the path of survivorship successfully. Published memoirs of cancer survivors are an untapped resource of rich data about the experience of survivorship from the personal perspective. They offer researchers the opportunity to gain understanding, within a narrative context, of how survivors use cognitive processes to make meaning of events and circumstances and to summon resources for a successful outcome. The purpose of this study was to elucidate cognitive processes by which cancer survivors manage the trajectory of survival, from diagnosis onward, as represented in published memoirs. Five book-length memoirs written in the first person, published within the past eight years, describing cancer trajectories beginning no more than 16 years ago, representing a variety of cancer diagnoses, and containing dense descriptions of illness-related events and subjective experiences were chosen for analysis. Memoirs of health professionals and those written with a co-author were excluded from the study. Data was analyzed with a combination of grounded theory and narrative analysis methods. Constant comparative analysis was used to code and cluster data from each memoir and to compare and synthesize data across the memoirs. A core narrative was constructed for each memoir to preserve its temporal structure as a point of reference during analysis. Nonlinear paths of survival which emerged from these memoirs were supported by five common cognitive processes: framing meaning within the context of the past and future, filtering choices about treatment and ways of coping through a personal explanatory framework, withdrawing strategically to protect the self, valuing gifts discovered in adversity, and choosing a new life. Ways for oncology nurses to respect individual paths to cancer survivorship are discussed. The use of study findings in planning for a cross-cultural naturalistic study of cognitive processes among cancer survivors is described.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:24:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:24:13Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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