Managing Viral Respiratory Infections in a Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT) Program: Empowering Nurses to Control Outcomes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165755
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Managing Viral Respiratory Infections in a Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT) Program: Empowering Nurses to Control Outcomes
Author(s):
Wehrlen, Leslie
Author Details:
Leslie Wehrlen, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
Abstract:
During the fall of 1998, an outbreak of seventeen documented viral upper respiratory illnesses (Influenza-A, N = 13; parainfluenza, N = 2; Adenovirus, N = 3; RSV, N = 1) prompted a multidisciplinary approach to prevent further spread and control future outbreaks. The objective of this group was to develop and implement infection control standards (ICS) to manage actual and potential viral upper respiratory illness (URI) among patients, families, and staff in the BMT program. The multidisciplinary team included nurses, physicians, and pharmacists from the BMT program, infectious disease, epidemiology, and occupational medical services. Prior to this outbreak, patients were placed on respiratory isolation (RI) when viral cultures returned positive. The improvement plan changed this standard and required patients to be placed on RI with the onset of any URI symptoms. In addition, intensive training of staff occurred around the transmission of different respiratory illnesses, the assessment of patients and families, and the management of patients on RI. It was also necessary to include intensive education for both inpatients and outpatients addressing recognition of URI symptoms and safe practices when at home and when entering the clinical facility. Signs were developed and posted at the nursing unit entrance requesting visitors to assess themselves for URI symptoms. A key component was developing these signs in both English and Spanish to accommodate the large number of Spanish-speaking patients and family involved in treatment. To address staff illness, all staff were strongly encouraged to get the influenza vaccine, which was provided free of charge. However, staff who developed URI symptoms were instructed to consult their nurse manager and occupational medical service for determination of ability to work. As a result of this multidisciplinary effort, the BMT nurses were empowered to implement the ICS for any patient they encountered with URI symptoms followed by notification of the physician and cultures, as ordered. A review of the plan in September 2000 revealed a need for modifications in the ICS making this a year-round practice instead of one only during the high-risk season. Following the implementation of the expanded plan, there have been no secondary transmissions of respiratory illness among patients or staff.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleManaging Viral Respiratory Infections in a Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT) Program: Empowering Nurses to Control Outcomesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWehrlen, Leslieen_US
dc.author.detailsLeslie Wehrlen, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165755-
dc.description.abstractDuring the fall of 1998, an outbreak of seventeen documented viral upper respiratory illnesses (Influenza-A, N = 13; parainfluenza, N = 2; Adenovirus, N = 3; RSV, N = 1) prompted a multidisciplinary approach to prevent further spread and control future outbreaks. The objective of this group was to develop and implement infection control standards (ICS) to manage actual and potential viral upper respiratory illness (URI) among patients, families, and staff in the BMT program. The multidisciplinary team included nurses, physicians, and pharmacists from the BMT program, infectious disease, epidemiology, and occupational medical services. Prior to this outbreak, patients were placed on respiratory isolation (RI) when viral cultures returned positive. The improvement plan changed this standard and required patients to be placed on RI with the onset of any URI symptoms. In addition, intensive training of staff occurred around the transmission of different respiratory illnesses, the assessment of patients and families, and the management of patients on RI. It was also necessary to include intensive education for both inpatients and outpatients addressing recognition of URI symptoms and safe practices when at home and when entering the clinical facility. Signs were developed and posted at the nursing unit entrance requesting visitors to assess themselves for URI symptoms. A key component was developing these signs in both English and Spanish to accommodate the large number of Spanish-speaking patients and family involved in treatment. To address staff illness, all staff were strongly encouraged to get the influenza vaccine, which was provided free of charge. However, staff who developed URI symptoms were instructed to consult their nurse manager and occupational medical service for determination of ability to work. As a result of this multidisciplinary effort, the BMT nurses were empowered to implement the ICS for any patient they encountered with URI symptoms followed by notification of the physician and cultures, as ordered. A review of the plan in September 2000 revealed a need for modifications in the ICS making this a year-round practice instead of one only during the high-risk season. Following the implementation of the expanded plan, there have been no secondary transmissions of respiratory illness among patients or staff.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:24:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:24:19Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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