Target Cancer Therapies: The Role of the Clinical Research Nurse in Tumor Procurement

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165756
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Target Cancer Therapies: The Role of the Clinical Research Nurse in Tumor Procurement
Author(s):
Smith, Susan
Author Details:
Susan Smith, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA
Abstract:
Targeted anti-cancer research is the wave of the future in clinical oncology. Research teams have identified potential therapeutic targets in cell surface receptors and in cell cycle pathway mediators. For example, by blocking the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, a transmembrane glycoprotein often over expressed in malignancies, signals which favor cell survival and growth may be suppressed. Our group is studying drugs that block the EGF receptor, but tissue must be first obtained in order to determine whether this target is present on the patient's tumor. In another clinical trial, our group is investigating the use of pre-treatment molecular profiling of a patient's colorectal tumor to guide selection of initial chemotherapy. The major difference in managing patients for target therapy treatments is that tissue analysis for these targets must occur BEFORE treatment can begin. For this reason, the role of the clinical research nurse in facilitating the timeliness of the process, while maintaining meticulous accuracy, is crucial. In these studies, the typical role and responsibilities of the research nurse has taken on a new dimension. The nurse must educate the patient on the rationale of acquiring special pathology slides or specimens. This includes assisting the physician in consenting the patient to have their tissue tested. It our responsibility to understand the pathology and the location of the tumor cells to accurately obtain the appropriate tissue needed. The research nurse must possess a strong clinical and scientific knowledge in order to clearly communicate the necessary priorities and information to all parties involved. The research nurse is the liaison and facilitator that coordinates the complex logistics and prioritization involved in pre-treatment tumor analysis. This abstract will review our experience with 105 patients receiving targeted treatments. We will present guidelines to assist the research nurse in the facilitation and management of these complex protocols. Additionally, we will review terminology to assist the nurse in reviewing pathology reports.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTarget Cancer Therapies: The Role of the Clinical Research Nurse in Tumor Procurementen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Susanen_US
dc.author.detailsSusan Smith, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165756-
dc.description.abstractTargeted anti-cancer research is the wave of the future in clinical oncology. Research teams have identified potential therapeutic targets in cell surface receptors and in cell cycle pathway mediators. For example, by blocking the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, a transmembrane glycoprotein often over expressed in malignancies, signals which favor cell survival and growth may be suppressed. Our group is studying drugs that block the EGF receptor, but tissue must be first obtained in order to determine whether this target is present on the patient's tumor. In another clinical trial, our group is investigating the use of pre-treatment molecular profiling of a patient's colorectal tumor to guide selection of initial chemotherapy. The major difference in managing patients for target therapy treatments is that tissue analysis for these targets must occur BEFORE treatment can begin. For this reason, the role of the clinical research nurse in facilitating the timeliness of the process, while maintaining meticulous accuracy, is crucial. In these studies, the typical role and responsibilities of the research nurse has taken on a new dimension. The nurse must educate the patient on the rationale of acquiring special pathology slides or specimens. This includes assisting the physician in consenting the patient to have their tissue tested. It our responsibility to understand the pathology and the location of the tumor cells to accurately obtain the appropriate tissue needed. The research nurse must possess a strong clinical and scientific knowledge in order to clearly communicate the necessary priorities and information to all parties involved. The research nurse is the liaison and facilitator that coordinates the complex logistics and prioritization involved in pre-treatment tumor analysis. This abstract will review our experience with 105 patients receiving targeted treatments. We will present guidelines to assist the research nurse in the facilitation and management of these complex protocols. Additionally, we will review terminology to assist the nurse in reviewing pathology reports.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:24:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:24:20Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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