The Transition From Graduate Nurse to Competent Oncology Nurse: A Comprehensive Approach

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165758
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Transition From Graduate Nurse to Competent Oncology Nurse: A Comprehensive Approach
Author(s):
Damsky, Deena
Author Details:
Deena Damsky, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Abstract:
We are in the throes of a nursing shortage that will only worsen in the next decade. Based on nursing workforce studies and economic predictions, Fox Chase Cancer Center has begun hiring new graduates as a source of "nurse power." This presentation will describe the strategy adopted by this comprehensive cancer center to prepare and support new graduates through the transition process. To ensure a successful outcome, we have accepted the following assumptions. 1) New nurses enter the workforce with minimal clinical experience due, in part, to the shift from hospital- to university-based nursing programs. 2) Employers must develop orientation programs that foster growth and development by breaking down competencies into small tasks that can be mastered step by step. 3) Nurse retention is linked to successful orientation experiences. A multi-tier competency-based curriculum was developed to assist new graduates in the transition to competent oncology nurses. A review of basic medical-surgical nursing principles is incorporated into a series of lectures and practicum during the initial weeks of orientation. The second tier includes oncology-intensive course content and clinical experience. The third tier focuses on patient care management and leadership competencies. Guided by the principles of adult learning, pre-assessed learning needs are matched with mandatory requirements. A clinical nurse specialist is the dedicated coordinator who facilitates all aspects of the program. Because preceptors are an important component of a successful orientation, we have instituted an eight-hour preceptor course for staff who are willing and qualified. Program implementation began in Spring 2001. We have budgeted for eight positions above our staffing complement, allowing us to count orientation time as non-productive hours. This will maximize the orientation experience and minimize orientee stress. We hope that "over building" our nursing force will produce competent oncology nurses. In the presentation, we will discuss our experience with the first cohort of new graduates.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Transition From Graduate Nurse to Competent Oncology Nurse: A Comprehensive Approachen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDamsky, Deenaen_US
dc.author.detailsDeena Damsky, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165758-
dc.description.abstractWe are in the throes of a nursing shortage that will only worsen in the next decade. Based on nursing workforce studies and economic predictions, Fox Chase Cancer Center has begun hiring new graduates as a source of "nurse power." This presentation will describe the strategy adopted by this comprehensive cancer center to prepare and support new graduates through the transition process. To ensure a successful outcome, we have accepted the following assumptions. 1) New nurses enter the workforce with minimal clinical experience due, in part, to the shift from hospital- to university-based nursing programs. 2) Employers must develop orientation programs that foster growth and development by breaking down competencies into small tasks that can be mastered step by step. 3) Nurse retention is linked to successful orientation experiences. A multi-tier competency-based curriculum was developed to assist new graduates in the transition to competent oncology nurses. A review of basic medical-surgical nursing principles is incorporated into a series of lectures and practicum during the initial weeks of orientation. The second tier includes oncology-intensive course content and clinical experience. The third tier focuses on patient care management and leadership competencies. Guided by the principles of adult learning, pre-assessed learning needs are matched with mandatory requirements. A clinical nurse specialist is the dedicated coordinator who facilitates all aspects of the program. Because preceptors are an important component of a successful orientation, we have instituted an eight-hour preceptor course for staff who are willing and qualified. Program implementation began in Spring 2001. We have budgeted for eight positions above our staffing complement, allowing us to count orientation time as non-productive hours. This will maximize the orientation experience and minimize orientee stress. We hope that "over building" our nursing force will produce competent oncology nurses. In the presentation, we will discuss our experience with the first cohort of new graduates.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:24:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:24:22Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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